oc

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of oc in English

English Online Dictionary. What means oc‎? What does oc mean?

Manx

Pronoun

oc (emphatic form ocsyn)

  1. third-person plural of ec
    at them

Middle Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish oc, from Proto-Celtic *onkus (near). Compare Middle Irish ocus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oɡ/

Preposition

oc

  1. at, beside, by (also used with a form of the substantive verb at·tá to express have)
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 1, published in Irische Teste, vol. 1 (1880), edited by Ernst Windisch:
  2. (used with a verbal noun to make a progressive aspect):

Inflection

  • Third-person singular masculine: oca, occo

Descendants

  • Irish: ag
  • Manx: ec
  • Scottish Gaelic: aig

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “oc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Northern Kurdish

Etymology

From Turkish öç.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oːd͡ʒ/

Noun

oc f

  1. revenge

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • ac

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *onkus (near), probably ultimately related to the root of the verbal suffix icc. Compare Old Irish ocus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oɡ/

Preposition

oc (with the dative)

  1. at, beside, by (also used with a form of the substantive verb at·tá to express have)
  2. (used with a verbal noun to make a progressive aspect):
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 16d8

Inflection

Forms combined with the definite article:

  • all genders singular: ocin(d), ocon(d)
  • all genders plural: ocnaib (once ocna in the feminine plural, possibly an error)

Forms combined with a possessive determiner:

  • first person singular: ocmu, ocmo
  • first person plural: occar
  • second person singular: acdu
  • second person plural: ocbar
  • third person all genders singular and plural: occa, oc(c)o (once ocua, possibly an error)

Forms combined with the relative pronoun: occa, oco

Descendants

  • Middle Irish: oc
    • Irish: ag
    • Manx: ec
    • Scottish Gaelic: aig

References

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “oc”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Thurneysen, Rudolf (1940, reprinted 2003)D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Old Irish, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, →ISBN, §§ 436, 848, pages 275, 524–25

Old Occitan

Etymology

From Latin hoc. Compare Old French oïl and o.

Adverb

oc

  1. yes

Antonyms

  • no

Descendants

  • Occitan: òc
  • Old Catalan: hoc, oc, hoch
  • French: langue d'oc
  • German: Oc-Sprache/oc-Sprache

Veps

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *occa.

Noun

oc

  1. forehead
  2. top, peak, summit

Inflection

References

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “вершина, лоб, чело”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

Bookmark
share
WebDictionary.net is an Free English Dictionary containing information about the meaning, synonyms, antonyms, definitions, translations, etymology and more.

Browse the English Dictionary

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

License

This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.