virus

virus

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of virus in English

English Online Dictionary. What means virus‎? What does virus mean?

English

Wikispecies

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin vīrus (poison, slime, venom), via rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (fluidity, slime, poison). First use in the computer context by David Gerrold in his 1972 book When HARLIE Was One.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: vīʹrəs, IPA(key): /ˈvaɪɹəs/
  • Rhymes: -aɪɹəs

Noun

virus (countable and uncountable, plural viruses or virusses or (rare) vira or (proscribed) viri or (proscribed) virii)

  1. A submicroscopic, non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat, that requires a living host cell to replicate, and often causes disease in the host organism.
    • 2001, Leslie Iversen, Drugs: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford 2001, p. 64)
      Viruses are the smallest and most simplified forms of life.
  2. A disease caused by these organisms.
  3. (archaic) Venom, as produced by a poisonous animal etc.
  4. (computing) A type of malware which can covertly transmit itself between computers via networks (especially the Internet) or removable storage such as disks, often causing damage to systems and data; also computer virus.
  5. (computing, proscribed) Any type of malware.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:virus

Hypernyms

  • (computing): malware

Hyponyms

  • DNA virus
  • RNA virus

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: バイラス (bairasu)
  • Korean: 바이러스 (baireoseu)

Translations

See also

  • prion

Further reading

  • Plural of virus on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Virus on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Computer virus on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Virus on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

Asturian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Noun

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus

Azerbaijani

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin virus.

Noun

virus (definite accusative virusu, plural viruslar)

  1. (medicine) virus (DNA/RNA causing disease)
  2. (computing) computer virus

Declension

Further reading

  • “virus” in Obastan.com.

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈvi.ɾus/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈbi.ɾus/

Noun

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus

Related terms

  • viral
  • víric

Cornish

Pronunciation

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [ˈviːrʏs]
  • (Revived Late Cornish) IPA(key): [ˈviːrɪz]

Noun

virus m (plural virusys)

  1. virus

References

  • Cornish-English Dictionary from Maga's Online Dictionary
  • 2018, Akademi Kernewek Gerlyver Kernewek (FSS) Cornish Dictionary (SWF) (2018 edition, p.190)

Czech

Alternative forms

  • vir

Etymology

From Latin virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈvɪrus]

Noun

virus m

  1. virus (submicroscopic, non-cellular structure)
  2. virus (type of computer malware)

Declension

Related terms

  • virolog
  • virologický
  • virologie
  • virový
  • virální
  • antivirový
  • zavirovat
  • odvirovat

Further reading

  • virus in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • virus in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • virus in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Noun

virus c or n (singular definite virussen or virusset, plural indefinite virus or virusser or vira, plural definite virussene or virusserne or viraene)

  1. virus

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin vīrus. Coined in the virological sense by Martinus Beijerinck; the word had been previously used for pathogens, although not for viruses in the modern sense. The computing sense derives from English virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈviː.rʏs/
  • Hyphenation: vi‧rus

Noun

virus n (plural virussen, diminutive virusje n)

  1. (microbiology) virus
  2. (computer science) virus

Usage notes

Like most Latin borrowings, this word kept its original Latin gender (neuter); it is one of the few words ending in -us which is not masculine.

Derived terms

  • computervirus
  • coronavirus
  • ebolavirus
  • griepvirus
  • herpesvirus
  • norovirus
  • viraal
  • virusinfectie
  • virusremmer

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋirus/, [ˈʋirus̠]
  • IPA(key): /ˈʋiːrus/, [ˈʋiːrus̠] (proscribed)
  • Rhymes: -irus
  • Syllabification: vi‧rus

Noun

virus

  1. virus
  2. (computer security) virus

Declension

Anagrams

  • virsu

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vi.ʁys/

Noun

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus

Further reading

  • “virus” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus (poison, slime, venom).

Noun

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus (pathogen)
  2. computer virus

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch virus, from Latin vīrus, from rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (fluidity, slime, poison). Doublet of bisa. The computing sense is a semantic loan from English virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈvirʊs]
  • Hyphenation: vi‧rus

Noun

virus (plural, first-person possessive virusku, second-person possessive virusmu, third-person possessive virusnya)

  1. virus,
    1. (biology) a submicroscopic, non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat, that requires a living host cell to replicate, and often causes disease in the host organism.
    2. (computing) a type of malware which can covertly transmit itself between computers via networks (especially the Internet) or removable storage such as disks, often causing damage to systems and data; also computer virus.

Further reading

  • “virus” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Interlingua

Noun

virus (plural viruses)

  1. virus

Related terms

  • virusal

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvi.rus/

Noun

virus m (invariable)

  1. (virology) virus

Further reading

  • virus in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Ladino

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvirus/

Noun

virus m (Latin spelling)

  1. virus

Latin

Etymology

Via rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (fluidity, slime, poison). Cognates include Sanskrit विष (viṣá), Ancient Greek ἰός (iós), from an older form ϝἰσός : wisós; Tocharian B wase, and Middle Irish . The neuter gender of this term despite its nominative singular ending in the masculine second-declension -us is a relic of this term's inheritance from a neuter s-stem.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈwiː.rus/, [ˈwiː.rʊs]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈvi.rus/, [ˈviː.rus]

Noun

vīrus n sg (genitive vīrī); second declension

  1. A stinking, or rammish smell.
  2. The seed or nature in animals.
  3. A nasty taste.
  4. Poison, venom.
  5. Bitterness, sharpness.
  6. The juice of the purple-fish.
  7. A strong smell of spices or perfumes.
  8. slimy liquid, slime
  9. (New Latin) virus (infectious organism)

Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter, nominative/accusative/vocative in -us), singular only.

  • There is also the heteroclitic genitive singular vīrūs.
  • When used in modern biology with the same meaning of English virus, a plural can be formed using the same suffixes of regular neuters of the 2nd. declension (i.e., vīra, vīrōrum, vīrīs, vīra, vīrīs, vīra).

Derived terms

  • vīrōsus
  • vīrulentus

Synonyms

  • (poison): venēnum

Descendants

References

  • virus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • virus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • virus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • virus in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Anagrams

  • rivus

Northern Sami

Pronunciation

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

virus

  1. virus

Inflection


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Noun

virus n (definite singular viruset, indefinite plural virus, definite plural virusa or virusene)

  1. a virus
  2. a computer virus (see datavirus)

References

  • “virus” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Noun

virus n (definite singular viruset, indefinite plural virus, definite plural virusa)

  1. a virus
  2. a computer virus (see datavirus)

References

  • “virus” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French virus, Latin virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvirus/
  • Rhymes: -irus
  • Hyphenation: vi‧rus

Noun

virus n (plural virusuri)

  1. virus

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Noun

vírus m (Cyrillic spelling ви́рус)

  1. (medicine) virus (DNA/RNA causing disease)
  2. (computing) computer virus

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbiɾus/
  • Rhymes: -iɾus
  • Hyphenation: vi‧rus

Noun

virus m (plural virus)

  1. virus
  2. computer virus

Derived terms

  • antivirus
  • viral
  • vírico
  • virulento

Further reading

  • “virus” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin virus.

Noun

virus n

  1. virus

Declension

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.