verbal

verbal

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of verbal in English

English Online Dictionary. What means verbal‎? What does verbal mean?

English

Etymology

From Old French verbal, from Late Latin verbālis (belonging to a word). Equivalent to verb +‎ -al.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈvɜː.bəl/, [ˈvɜː.bɫ̩], enPR: vûrʹ-bəl
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈvɝ.bəl/, [ˈvɜ˞.bɫ̩], enPR: vûrʹ-bəl
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)bəl
  • Hyphenation: ver‧bal

Adjective

verbal (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to words.
    Synonym: wordish
  2. Concerned with the words, rather than the substance of a text.
  3. Consisting of words only.
    Antonyms: non-verbal, substantive
    • 1864, Henry Mayhew, German Life and Manners as Seen in Saxony at the Present
  4. Expressly spoken rather than written; oral.
  5. (grammar) Derived from, or having the nature of a verb.
    Synonym: rhematic
  6. (grammar) Used to form a verb.
  7. Capable of speech.
    Antonym: preverbal
    • 2005, Avril V. Brereton, Bruce J. Tonge, Pre-schoolers with autism (page 55)
  8. Word for word.
    Synonyms: literal, verbatim
  9. (obsolete) Abounding with words; verbose.

Synonyms

  • (of or relating to speech or words): lectic

Antonyms

  • (expressly spoken or written): implied
  • (expressly stated): unsaid

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

verbal (countable and uncountable, plural verbals)

  1. (countable, grammar) A verb form which does not function as a predicate, or a word derived from a verb. In English, infinitives, participles and gerunds are verbals.
    Synonym: non-finite verb
  2. (countable, UK, Ireland) A spoken confession given to police.
  3. (uncountable, UK, Ireland, colloquial) Talk; speech, especially banter or scolding.
    • 2013, Lenny McLean, The Guv'nor
      We'd give him a bit of verbal, out would come the bouncers, chucking their weight about, and it would all end in a right tear-up.

Translations

Verb

verbal (third-person singular simple present verbals, present participle verballing, simple past and past participle verballed)

  1. (transitive, Britain, Australia) To induce into fabricating a confession.
    • 1982, John A. Andrews, Human Rights in Criminal Procedure: A Comparative Study, →ISBN, BRILL, page 128:
      "The problem of 'verballing' is unlikely to disappear, whatever the legal status of the person detained."
    • 2001, Chris Cunneen, Conflict, Politics and Crime: Aboriginal Communities and the Police, →ISBN, Allen & Unwin, page 116:
      "Condren had always claimed that he was assaulted and verballed by police over the murder he had supposedly confessed to committing."
    • 2004, Jeremy Gans & Andrew Palmer, Australian Principles of Evidence, →ISBN, Routledge Cavendish, page 504:
      "Moreover, given the risk of verballing, it is by no means apparent that it is in the interests of justice that the prosecution have the benefit of admissions that are made on occasions when recordings are impracticable."

Anagrams

  • Varble, Vrabel

Aragonese

Adjective

verbal m or f (plural verbals)

  1. (grammar) verbal (relating to verbs)

Related terms

  • verbo

Catalan

Etymology

From Late Latin verbālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /vəɾˈbal/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /bərˈbal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /veɾˈbal/

Adjective

verbal (masculine and feminine plural verbals)

  1. verbal (of or relating to words)
  2. verbal (spoken rather than written)
  3. (grammar) verbal (relating to verbs)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • verb

Further reading

  • “verbal” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin verbālis. Synchronically analysable as verbe +‎ -al.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɛʁ.bal/
  • Homophones: verbale, verbales

Adjective

verbal (feminine singular verbale, masculine plural verbaux, feminine plural verbales)

  1. verbal

Derived terms

  • cadrage verbal
  • diarrhée verbale
  • locution verbale
  • temps verbal

Further reading

  • “verbal”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɛʁˈbaːl/
  • Rhymes: -aːl

Adjective

verbal (not comparable)

  1. verbal
    Synonym: mündlich

Declension

Further reading

  • “verbal” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • “verbal” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch verbaal, from Middle French verbal, from Latin verbālis. Doublet of perbal.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [vərˈbal]
  • Hyphenation: vêr‧bal

Adjective

verbal or vêrbal

  1. verbal,
    1. expressly spoken rather than written; oral.
    2. (linguistics) pertaining to verbs

Further reading

  • “verbal” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Late Latin verbālis.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ver‧bal
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Adjective

verbal m or f (plural verbais, comparable)

  1. verbal, oral
  2. (grammar) verbal (derived from, or having the nature of a verb)

Derived terms

  • verbalmente

Romanian

Etymology

From French verbal, from Latin verbalis.

Adjective

verbal m or n (feminine singular verbală, masculine plural verbali, feminine and neuter plural verbale)

  1. verbal

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Late Latin verbālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beɾˈbal/, [beɾˈβ̞al]

Adjective

verbal (plural verbales)

  1. verbal (of or relating to words)
  2. verbal (spoken rather than written)
  3. (grammar) verbal (relating to verbs)

Derived terms

Noun

verbal m or f (plural verbales)|verbales

  1. (grammar) verbal

Related terms

  • verbo

Further reading

  • “verbal” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse *viðribarðr (from berja.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²ˈʋɪːɾˌbɑːɽ/, /²ˈʋɪːɾˌbɒːɽ/

Adjective

verbal

  1. weather-beaten

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.