van

van

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of van in English

English Online Dictionary. What means van‎? What does van mean?

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: văn, IPA(key): /væn/
  • Rhymes: -æn

Etymology 1

Short for caravan.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. A (covered) vehicle used for carrying goods or people, usually roughly cuboid in shape, longer and higher than a car but smaller than a truck/lorry.
  2. (Britain) An enclosed railway vehicle for transport of goods.
  3. (Britain, dated) A light wagon, either covered or open, used by tradesmen and others for the transportation of goods.
  4. (aeronautics, space) A large towable vehicle equipped for the repair of structures that cannot easily be moved.
    • 1959, Western Aerospace (volume 39, page 46)
      Designed to be fully mobile and self-contained, the complete equipment includes an air-conditioned van containing all necessary electronic gear and a flat bed trailer in which missiles, jet engines and other large assemblies may be cleaned.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

van (third-person singular simple present vans, present participle vanning, simple past and past participle vanned)

  1. (transitive) To transport in a van or similar vehicle (especially of horses).
  2. (Internet slang, used in passive voice) Of law enforcement: to arrest (not necessarily in a van; derived from party van).
    • 2011 The hackers hacked: main Anonymous IRC servers invaded
      One Anon explained the reason for this, saying: "As for the domains, they were transferred to Ryan after some of us got vanned so he can keep the network up. What he did certainly wasn't the plan." (Getting "vanned" refers to getting picked up by the police.)
    • 2012 FBI names, arrests Anon who infiltrated its secret conference call
      He later told CW that he had been "v&" or "vanned" by the police, and he expressed surprise that the police showed him detailed transcripts of his conversations.
    • 2013 Redditor Confesses to Murder with Meme, Gets Doxed by Other Redditors, Deletes His Account and Disappears
      But not before someone supposedly forwarded all the information onto the FBI. In a last-ditch effort to avoid getting "vanned," Naratto tried to put the memie back in the bottle
    • 2015 13-year-old credited with hacking CIA director’s AOL account gives bizarre, possibly final interview
      The hacker says he thinks he is about to be v&, or “vanned,” meaning being raided by law enforcement, sometime soon.
    • 2016 Teen Allegedly Behind CIA, FBI Breaches: 'They're Trying to Ruin My Life.'
      On Wednesday night, Motherboard spoke to the teenager accused of being Cracka. "I got fucking v&," he told Motherboard, using "v&," the slang for "vanned," or getting arrested. (At this point, the arrest had not been made public.)
    • 2017 Dark Ops: An Anonymous Story page 8
      Commander X: Yep, so now you all know how I got vanned. And you just met the snitch who did it to me.
Derived terms
  • v&

See also

  • lorry
  • transit (UK)
  • truck

Etymology 2

Shortening of vanguard.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. Clipping of vanguard.
    • As for the guides, they were debarred from the pleasure of discourse, the one being placed in the van, and the other obliged to bring up the rear.

Etymology 3

From Cornish.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. (mining) A shovel used in cleansing ore.

Verb

van (third-person singular simple present vans, present participle vanning, simple past and past participle vanned)

  1. (mining) To wash or cleanse, as a small portion of ore, on a shovel.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)

Etymology 4

From Latin vannus (a van, or fan for winnowing grain): compare French van and English fan, winnow.

Noun

van (plural vans)

  1. A fan or other contrivance, such as a sieve, for winnowing grain.
  2. A wing with which the air is beaten.

References

  • van at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • van in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • AVN, NAV, nav

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch van (from; of).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fan/

Preposition

van

  1. of
  2. from

Particle

van

  1. (used with a following definite article) some of (the)
    Van die wêreld se beste wyne kom van hierdie streek af.
    Some of the world’s best wines are from this region.
    Ons het met van die belangrikste politieke leiers gespreek.
    We have spoken to some of the most important political leaders.

Antillean Creole

Etymology

From French vent.

Noun

van

  1. air
  2. wind
  3. breath
  4. intestinal gas

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈvan/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈban/

Verb

van

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of anar

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse vanr (pl vanir (one of two groups of gods in Norse mythology)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vaːn/, [væːˀn]

Noun

van c (singular definite vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. one of the Vanir
Inflection

Etymology 2

From English van.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vaːn/, [væːn]

Noun

van c (singular definite vanen, plural indefinite vaner)

  1. van
Inflection

Etymology 3

From Old Norse vanr (wont, accustomed).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /van/, [van]

Adverb

van

  1. (dated) pleje van – nurse, take care of

Usage notes

  • Has been replaced by vant ("usual", "customary").

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch van, from Old Dutch fan (from), from Proto-Germanic *fanē, from Proto-Indo-European *pone, *pana (from), from Proto-Indo-European *apo-, *pā- (off, of). Cognate with Old Saxon fana, fan (from), Old Frisian fan, fon (from), Old High German fona, fon (from).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɑn/
  • (Northern) [fɑn]
  • (Suriname) [fan]
  • Hyphenation: van
  • Rhymes: -ɑn

Preposition

van

  1. of (possession, property)
  2. of (general association)
  3. by, of (creator)
  4. from (origin)
  5. from (starting point of a movement or change)
  6. from (starting point in time)
  7. from, off (removal of something from off something else)
  8. of, out of, from, with (cause)
  9. of, out of, with (material or resource)
  10. of, out of, among (out of a larger whole; partitive)
  11. from, was, formerly (indicating a change in price)
  12. (colloquial) like (introduces a quotation)

Inflection

Derived terms

Adverb

van

  1. of, from
    Ik neem er tien van. — I’ll take ten of them.
  2. from
    Ik vertrek van daar. — I’ll start from there.
  3. by, from
    Ik word er gek van. — It drives me crazy.
    Men wordt daar sloom van. — It turns one numb.
  4. of, about
    Wat zegt u daar van? — What do you say about that?
    Ik weet daar niks van. — I don’t know anything about that.

Derived terms

  • daarvan
  • ervan

See also

  • uit

French

Etymology

Latin vannus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɑ̃/

Noun

van m (plural vans)

  1. a winnowing basket

Further reading

  • “van” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Etymology

From a variant of Old Portuguese vão, from Latin vānus (empty)

Adjective

van m (feminine singular va, masculine plural vans, feminine plural vas)

  1. empty, devoid of content, containing only air
  2. useless, ineffective
  3. (of a person) vacuous, trivial-minded

Noun

van m (plural vans)

  1. waist
  2. empty, vacant

Verb

van

  1. third-person plural present indicative of ir

Gallo

Etymology

Noun

van m (plural vans)

  1. (agriculture) winnowing machine

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French vent (wind)

Noun

van

  1. wind

Hungarian

Etymology

From Old Hungarian vagyon. See Hungarian volt.

  • Forms beginning with v- are from Proto-Finno-Ugric *wole- (to be). Cognate with Mansi о̄луӈкве (ōluňkve), Finnish olla and Estonian olema. Compare inflected forms such as volt, volna, való and Old Hungarian vola or vala. The root in present tense (vagy-) is result of palatization: /vɒl/ > /vɒʎ/ > /vɒj/ > /vɒɟ/.
  • Forms beginning with l- are from Proto-Finno-Ugric *le- (to become). Cognate with Finnish lienee (potential of olla), Karelian lienöy (potential of olla), Northern Sami leat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈvɒn]

Verb

van

  1. be, exist
  2. have; someone (-nak/-nek) has something (-ja/-je/-a/-e)
  3. there is
  4. to be (auxiliary verb indicating a type of passive voice along with the adverbial participle form of the main verb)
    1846, Arany János, Toldi,[2], canto 6, stanza 13:

Usage notes

  • Omission of van and vannak:
    When used with an adjective (qualification) or a noun (whether with the definite or the indefinite article), i.e. when it answers the question who? or what? (including what...like?) or which?, the (indicative present third-person) forms van and vannak are omitted:
    Béla okos. - Béla is clever.
    Béla a király. - Béla is the king.
    Béla egy ember. - Béla is a human.
    On the other hand, if is or are answers the question where? or how?, these verb forms will appear as usual:
    Béla itt van. - Béla is here.
    Béla jól van. - Béla is (feeling) well.
    It also appears if van/vannak is the focus of the sentence. This happens when the sentence means that the property described by the adjective (e.g. strength) reaches or exceeds some specified level and this is emphasized by the speaker. In this case, the adjective is preceded by a word like olyan (such), annyira (that much), elég (enough).
    Béla van annyira erős, hogy felemelje a szekrényt. - Béla is strong enough to lift the cupboard.
    The forms other than van and vannak are always used.
    Béla okos volt. - Béla was clever.
    Okos vagyok. - I am clever.
    Otherwise, all forms are used:
    With adverbs and adverbial participles (suffixed -va/-ve)
    Hogy van? - How is he? (also 'How are you?', formal singular)
    El van törve. - It is broken.
    Using in the "exists" or "there is" sense (and so with have, which is expressed by there is in Hungarian)
    Van egy ház a hegyen. - There is a house on the mountain.
    Van egy kutyám. - I have a dog.
  • The negative form is nincs or nincsen and sincs or sincsen (the latter two expressing 'is not...either').
    Nincs pénzem. - I don't have any money.
    Itt sincs étel. - There isn't any food here either.
    If the predicate includes an adjective or a noun, that is, if it answers the question who, what etc. (see above), the third person present forms are omitted again, only nem remains:
    Béla nem tanár. - Béla is not a teacher.

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (exist): létezik

Antonyms

  • nincs

Derived terms

  • vanni

(With verbal prefixes):

  • elvan
  • hátravan
  • kivan
  • megvan
  • odavan

(Expressions):

  • a falnak is füle van
  • az éremnek két oldala van
  • hogy van?
  • minden rosszban van valami jó
  • tele van a hócipője
  • tisztában van
  • van benne valami

Interlingua

Adjective

van (comparative plus van, superlative le plus van)

  1. vain, futile
  2. vain, worthless
  3. vain, conceited

Manx

Etymology

Borrowed from English van.

Noun

van f (genitive singular van, plural vannyn)

  1. van (vehicle)

Synonyms

  • carr

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch fan, from Proto-Germanic *fanē.

Preposition

van

  1. of
  2. from (a place, person)
  3. from (a time)
  4. out of
  5. from, out of, because of

Descendants

  • Dutch: van
  • Limburgish: ven

Further reading

  • “van”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “van (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Portuguese

Noun

van f (plural vans)

  1. van (a covered vehicle used for carrying goods)

Synonyms

  • furgão

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin vānus, Italian vano.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /van/

Adjective

van m or n (feminine singular vană, masculine plural vani, feminine and neuter plural vane)

  1. vain
  2. futile
  3. idle
  4. fruitless
  5. vainglorious

Declension

Derived terms

  • în van

Related terms

  • vanitate

See also

  • inutil, infructuos, vanitos
  • în zadar
  • zadarnic

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *vъnъ

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋân/

Conjunction

vȁn (Cyrillic spelling ва̏н)

  1. except

Etymology 2

From Proto-Slavic *vъnъ

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋân/

Preposition

vȁn (Cyrillic spelling ва̏н) (+ genitive case)

  1. outside, out
  2. out of

Etymology 3

From Proto-Slavic *vъnъ

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋâːn/
  • Rhymes: -âːn

Adverb

vȃn (Cyrillic spelling ва̑н)

  1. out, outside, outdoors

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin vadunt, third-person plural present indicative of vadō (I go).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ban/, [bãn]

Verb

van

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of ir.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of ir.

Noun

van m (plural vanes)

  1. van (vehicle)

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse vanr, from Proto-Germanic *wanaz, from Proto-Indo-European *wāno-.

Pronunciation

Adjective

van (comparative vanare, superlative vanast)

  1. accustomed to; used to, have the habit to
    Han är van vid att stiga upp klockan sju varje morgon.
    “He is used to getting up at seven every morning.”
  2. experienced, adept
    Hon är en van bilförare.
    “She is an experienced driver.”

Antonyms

  • ovan

Derived terms

  • med van hand

Related terms

  • vana
  • vänja
  • ovana

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [vaːn˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [vaːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [vaːŋ˧˧] ~ [jaːŋ˧˧]

Etymology 1

Verb

van (呅, 𠹚, 𠺺)

  1. to beg, to implore
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French valve.

Noun

van

  1. valve

Etymology 3

Borrowed from French valse.

Noun

van

  1. waltz

Bookmark
share
WebDictionary.net is an Free English Dictionary containing information about the meaning, synonyms, antonyms, definitions, translations, etymology and more.

Browse the English Dictionary

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

License

This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.