talent

talent

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of talent in English

English Online Dictionary. What means talent‎? What does talent mean?

English

Etymology

From Middle English talent, from Old English talente, borrowed from the plural of Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent). Compare Old High German talenta (talent). Later senses from Old French talent (a talent, also will, inclination, desire).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtælənt/
  • (UK, also) IPA(key): /ˈtalənt/
  • Hyphenation: tal‧ent

Noun

talent (plural talents)

  1. A marked natural ability or skill. [from 15thc.]
  2. (historical) A unit of weight and money used in ancient times in Greece, the Roman Empire, and the Middle East. [from 9thc.]
    • 1611, Authorized Version, Matthew XXV 14-15:
      For the kingdom of heaven is as a man travelling into a far country, who called his own servants, and delivered unto them his goods. And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.
  3. (obsolete) A desire or inclination for something. [14th-16thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xx, in Le Morte Darthur, book X:
      But my hede said sir Palomydes I wille not ryde these thre dayes / [] / Truly said sir Lamorak / and I wille abyde here with you / And whan ye ryde / thenne wille I ryde / [] / therfor I pray you syr Dynadan abyde and ryde with vs / Feythfully said Dynadan I wylle not abyde for I haue suche a talent to see sir Tristram that I may not abyde longe from hym
  4. (business, media, sports) People of talent, viewed collectively; a talented person. [from 19thc.]
  5. (slang) The men or (especially) women of a place or area, judged by their attractiveness. [from 20thc.]
    • 2011, Nic Venter, Wow! What a Life! (page 179)
      I went down to the beach front, of course, for that was the first thing that all Vaalies did: to look at the sea and to check the talent on the beach.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:skill

Derived terms

  • talent scout

Translations

Further reading

  • talent in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • talent in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • antlet, latent, latten

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /təˈlent/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /təˈlen/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /taˈlent/

Noun

talent m (plural talents)

  1. talent (Greek money)
  2. talent (skill)
  3. hunger
    Synonym: gana

Derived terms

  • atalentat
  • talentós

Further reading

  • “talent” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

Noun

talent m

  1. talent (unit of weight)
  2. talent (actual or potential ability)

Synonyms

  • (ability): nadání n

Related terms

  • talentovaný

Further reading

  • talent in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • talent in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from German Talent (talent), from Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talɛnt/, [taˈlɛnˀd̥]

Noun

talent n (singular definite talentet, plural indefinite talenter)

  1. talent (potential or factual ability to perform a skill better than most people)
Inflection
See also
  • talent on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Etymology 2

From Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance, a particular weight, especially of gold, sum of money, a talent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talɛnt/, [taˈlɛnˀd̥]

Noun

talent c (singular definite talenten, plural indefinite talenter)

  1. talent (unit of weight and money)
Inflection

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch talent, from Old French talent, from Latin talentum, from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, a particular weight, balance), from Proto-Indo-European *tl̥h₂ent-, from *telh₂-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taːˈlɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: ta‧lent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

talent n (plural talenten, diminutive talentje n)

  1. talent (gift, quality, capability)
  2. (historical) talent (ancient weight, value of money or coin)

Derived terms

  • met zijn talenten woekeren
  • talentenjacht
  • talentvol

Anagrams

  • latten

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance; a particular weight, especially of gold; sum of money; a talent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ta.lɑ̃/

Noun

talent m (plural talents)

  1. (historical, Ancient Rome, Ancient Greece) a talent (an obsolete unit of weight or money)
  2. a talent, a gift, a knack

Derived terms

  • talentueux

Further reading

  • “talent” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • latent

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from Medieval Latin talentum.

Noun

talent n (definite singular talentet, indefinite plural talent or talenter, definite plural talenta or talentene)

  1. (a) talent

Derived terms

  • talentfull

References

  • “talent” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Medieval Latin talentum

Noun

talent n (definite singular talentet, indefinite plural talent, definite plural talenta)

  1. (a) talent

Derived terms

  • talentfull

References

  • “talent” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Alternative forms

  • talant

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum (a Grecian weight; a talent of money), from Ancient Greek τάλαντον (tálanton, balance; a particular weight, especially of gold; sum of money; a talent).

Noun

talent m (oblique plural talenz or talentz, nominative singular talenz or talentz, nominative plural talent)

  1. desire; wish (to do something)

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈta.lɛnt/

Noun

talent m inan

  1. talent, gift
  2. (historical) talent (ancient unit of weight and money)

Declension

Noun

talent m pers

  1. (metonymically) talented person

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • (Bosnian, Serbian): tàlenat

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin talentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tǎlent/
  • Hyphenation: ta‧lent

Noun

tàlent m (Cyrillic spelling та̀лент)

  1. (Croatia) talent

Declension


Welsh

Alternative forms

  • talen (colloquial)

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /ˈtalɛnt/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈtaːlɛnt/, /ˈtalɛnt/

Verb

talent

  1. (literary) third-person plural imperfect/conditional of talu

Mutation

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.