tag

tag

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of tag in English

English Online Dictionary. What means tag‎? What does tag mean?

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English tagge (small piece hanging from a garment), probably of North Germanic origin. Compare Norwegian tagg (point; prong; barb; tag), Swedish tagg (thorn; prickle; tine), Icelandic tág (a willow-twig). Compare also tack.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: tăg, IPA(key): /tæɡ/
  • (North American also) IPA(key): /teɪɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

tag (plural tags)

  1. A small label.
  2. A children's chasing game in which one player (known as "it") attempts to touch another, who then becomes "it".
  3. A skin tag, an excrescence of skin.
  4. A type of cardboard.
  5. Graffiti in the form of a stylized signature particular to the artist.
    • 2011, Scape Martinez, Graff 2: Next Level Graffiti Techniques (page 124)
      There is a hierarchy of sorts: a throw-up can go over a tag, a piece over a throw-up, and a burner over a piece.
  6. A dangling lock of sheep's wool, matted with dung; a dung tag.
  7. (informal, authorship) An attribution in narrated dialogue (eg, "he said") or attributed words (e.g. "he thought").
    Synonyms: dialogue tag, speech tag, tag line
    • (Can we date this quote?),
    • (Can we date this quote?)
    • (Can we date this quote?)
  8. (music) The last line (or last two lines) of a song's chorus that is repeated to indicate the end of the song.
  9. (television) The last scene of a TV program, often focusing on the program's subplot.
    Antonym: cold open
    • 2006, Stephen V. Duncan, A Guide to Screenwriting Success (page 300)
      Often, the tag punctuates the "we're all in this together" theme and is topped with a laugh.
  10. (chiefly US) A vehicle number plate; a medal bearing identification data (animals, soldiers).
  11. (baseball) An instance of touching the baserunner with the ball or the ball in a gloved hand to rule him "out."
  12. (computing) A piece of markup representing an element in a markup language.
  13. (computing) A keyword, term, or phrase associated with or assigned to data, media, and/or information enabling keyword-based classification; often used to categorize content.
  14. Any slight appendage, as to an article of dress; something slight hanging loosely.
  15. A metallic binding, tube, or point, at the end of a string, or lace, to stiffen it.
  16. The end, or catchword, of an actor's speech; cue.
  17. Something mean and paltry; the rabble.
  18. A sheep in its first year.
  19. (biochemistry) Any short peptide sequence artificially attached to proteins mostly in order to help purify, solubilize or visualize these proteins.
  20. (slang) A person's name.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • tagball
  • tagless
  • tag question
See also

(children's game to avoid being "it"):

  • chasey
  • dodgeball
  • paintball
Translations

Verb

tag (third-person singular simple present tags, present participle tagging, simple past and past participle tagged)

  1. (transitive) To label (something).
  2. (transitive, graffiti) To mark (something) with one’s tag.
  3. (transitive) To remove dung tags from a sheep.
    Regularly tag the rear ends of your sheep.
  4. (transitive, baseball, colloquial) To hit the ball hard.
    He really tagged that ball.
  5. (transitive, baseball) To put a runner out by touching them with the ball or the ball in a gloved hand.
    He tagged the runner for the out.
  6. (transitive, computing) To mark with a tag (metadata for classification).
    I am tagging my music files by artist and genre.
  7. To follow closely, accompany, tag along.
    • 1906, O. Henry, By Courier
      A tall young man came striding through the park along the path near which she sat. Behind him tagged a boy carrying a suit-case.
  8. (transitive) To catch and touch (a player in the game of tag).
  9. (transitive) To fit with, or as if with, a tag or tags.
    • His courteous host []
      Tags every sentence with some fawning word.
  10. To fasten; to attach.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bolingbroke to this entry?)

Antonyms

  • (computing): untag
Translations
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Aramaic תגא(crown). Doublet of taj.

Noun

tag (plural tagin)

  1. A decoration drawn over some Hebrew letters in Jewish scrolls.

References

  • tag at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • ATG, GTA, TGA, gat

Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • tage (Luserna)

Etymology

From Middle High German tag, tac, from Old High German tag, tac, from Proto-West Germanic *dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz. Cognate with German Tag, English day.

Noun

tag m (plural taaghe)

  1. (Sette Comuni) day

Declension

Related terms

  • gabüarttag

References

  • “tag” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Crimean Gothic

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Noun

tag

  1. day
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Tag. Dies.

Derived terms

  • knauen tag

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse þak (thatch, roof), from Proto-Germanic *þaką, cognate with Swedish tak, English thack, thatch, German Dach, Dutch dak.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taːˀɣ/, [ˈtˢæˀ(j)]

Noun

tag n (singular definite taget, plural indefinite tage)

  1. roof
Inflection

Derived terms

Related terms
  • tække

Etymology 2

From Old Norse tak (hold, grasp), cognate with Norwegian tak, Swedish tag. Derived from the verb taka (Danish tage).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ta(ːˀ)ɣ/, [ˈtˢæˀ(j)], [ˈtˢɑw]

Noun

tag n (singular definite taget, plural indefinite tag)

  1. hold, grasp, grip
  2. stroke (with an oar or with the armes in the water)
  3. handling, control
Inflection

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English tag (since 1985).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taɡ/, [ˈtˢæɡ̊]

Noun

tag n (singular definite tagget, plural indefinite tags)

  1. tag (signature of a graffiti artist)
  2. (computing) tag (markup in an electronic file)
Inflection

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ta(ːˀ)/, [ˈtˢæ(ˀ)]

Verb

tag

  1. imperative of tage

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English tag.

Pronunciation

Noun

tag n (plural tags, diminutive tagje n)

  1. tag

Finnish

Noun

tag

  1. Alternative form of tagi

Declension


French

Etymology

Borrowed from English tag.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taɡ/
  • Rhymes: -aɡ

Noun

tag m (plural tags)

  1. tag

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taːk/
  • Rhymes: -aːk

Verb

tag

  1. singular imperative of tagen

Hungarian

Etymology 1

Of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɒɡ]
  • Hyphenation: tag
  • Rhymes: -ɒɡ

Noun

tag (plural tagok)

  1. member
  2. Synonym of végtag (limb)
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English tag (piece of markup).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɛɡ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡ

Noun

tag (plural tagek)

  1. (computing) tag (a piece of markup representing an element in a markup language)
Declension

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English tag (a piece of graffiti).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɛɡ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡ

Noun

tag (plural tagek)

  1. tag (graffiti in the form of a stylized signature particular to the artist)
Declension

References

Further reading

  • tag in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Meriam

Noun

tag

  1. arm, hand

Middle High German

Alternative forms

  • tac, dach (northern)

Etymology

From Old High German tag, tac, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, whence also Old English dæġ and Old Norse dagr. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Noun

tag m

  1. day
  2. age, lifetime
  3. (politics) convention, congress
  4. (in a religious context) judgement day

Descendants

  • Alemannic German: Tag
    Alsatian: Dàà (north), Dàj (center), Dàg (south)
    Italian Walser: tag, tog, tàg
    Swabian: Dag
  • Bavarian: Da, Dåg, Doch
    Cimbrian: tak, ta, tag, tage
    Mòcheno: ta
    Udinese: tach, ti
  • Central Franconian: Daach
    Hunsrik: Daagh, taach
  • East Central German:
    Upper Saxon: Dag
  • German: Tag
    Esperanto: tago
  • Luxembourgish: Dag, Do
  • Rhine Franconian: Tach
    Pennsylvania German: Daag
  • Vilamovian: taog
  • Yiddish: טאָג(tog)

References


Old High German

Alternative forms

  • tac, tak, dac, *dag (northern)

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, whence also Old English dæġ, Old Norse dagr, Old Dutch and Old Saxon dag, Old High German tag, Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌲𐍃 (dags). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taɡ/, /taɣ/

Noun

tag m (plural taga)

  1. day
    tag after tage
    day after day

Declension

Derived terms

  • tagalih
    • tagalihhen
    • tagalihhes
    • tagalihhida
  • ziestag

Descendants

  • Middle High German: tag, tac, dach
    • Alemannic German: Tag
      Alsatian: Dàà (north), Dàj (center), Dàg (south)
      Italian Walser: tag, tog, tàg
      Swabian: Dag
    • Bavarian: Da, Dåg, Doch
      Cimbrian: tak, ta, tag, tage
      Mòcheno: ta
      Udinese: tach, ti
    • Central Franconian: Daach
      Hunsrik: Daagh, taach
    • East Central German:
      Upper Saxon: Dag
    • German: Tag
      Esperanto: tago
    • Luxembourgish: Dag, Do
    • Rhine Franconian: Tach
      Pennsylvania German: Daag
    • Vilamovian: taog
    • Yiddish: טאָג(tog)

References

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Polish

Etymology

From English tag, from Middle English tagge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tak/
  • Homophone: tak

Noun

tag m inan

  1. (computing) tag (piece of markup representing an element in a markup language)
    Synonym: znacznik

Declension

Further reading

  • tag in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • tag in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse tak.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɑːɡ/

Noun

tag n

  1. a grip; a hold (of something)
    Tappa inte taget
    Don’t lose your grip
    Släpp inte taget
    Don’t let go
  2. a stroke (with an oar; in swimming)
    Ett tag till med åran
    One more stroke with the oar
  3. a while, a moment, a minute, sec, second, tic
    Ett litet tag
    A little while, a second

Declension

Derived terms

  • få tag i
  • hårda tag
  • i första taget
  • vara i tagen

Verb

tag

  1. imperative of taga.

Alternative forms

  • ta

Anagrams

  • ATG

Westrobothnian

Etymology 1

From Old Norse tak, by analogy with taga (to take). Also rendered as tak.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [tʰɑ́ːɣ], [tʰáːɣ], [tʰǽːɣ]
    Rhymes: -áːɣ

Noun

tag n (definite singular tagjä, dative tagjän)

  1. Grip, hold.
  2. Advantage.
Alternative forms
  • tak

Etymology 2

From Old Norse taug, tog, from Proto-Germanic *taugō, *tugą.

Noun

tag n (definite singular tagjä, dative tagjän)

  1. A rope.
Synonyms
  • raip

Etymology 3

Verb

tag

  1. singular present of taga
  2. singular imperative of taga

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