sugar

sugar

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of sugar in English

English Online Dictionary. What means sugar‎? What does sugar mean?

English

  • Sugar in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Alternative forms

  • shugar (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English sugre, sucre, from Middle French sucre, from Old French çucre (circa 13th century), from Medieval Latin zuccarum, from Old Italian zúccharo, from Arabic سُكَّر(sukkar), from Persian شکر(šakar), from Middle Persian [script needed] (škl), 𐫢𐫞𐫡(šqr /šakar/), from Sanskrit शर्करा (śárkarā, ground or candied sugar", originally "grit, gravel). Akin to Ancient Greek κρόκη (krókē, pebble). Doublet of jaggery.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈʃʊɡə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) enPR: sho͝ogʹər, IPA(key): /ˈʃʊɡɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ʊɡə(ɹ)

Noun

sugar (countable and uncountable, plural sugars)

  1. (uncountable) Sucrose in the form of small crystals, obtained from sugar cane or sugar beet and used to sweeten food and drink.
  2. (countable) A specific variety of sugar.
  3. (countable, chemistry) Any of various small carbohydrates that are used by organisms to store energy.
    Hypernyms: see Thesaurus:carbohydrate
  4. (countable) A small serving of this substance (typically about one teaspoon), used to sweeten a drink.
  5. (countable) A term of endearment.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:sweetheart
  6. (countable, slang) A kiss.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:buss
  7. (chiefly southern US, slang, uncountable) Effeminacy in a male, often implying homosexuality.
  8. (uncountable, informal) Diabetes.
  9. (dated) Anything resembling sugar in taste or appearance, especially in chemistry.
  10. Compliment or flattery used to disguise or render acceptable something obnoxious; honeyed or soothing words.
  11. (US, slang, uncountable) Heroin.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:heroin
  12. (US, slang, uncountable, dated) Money.
  13. (programming) Syntactic sugar.

Hyponyms

Meronyms

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

Verb

sugar (third-person singular simple present sugars, present participle sugaring, simple past and past participle sugared)

  1. (transitive) To add sugar to; to sweeten with sugar.
  2. (transitive) To make (something unpleasant) seem less so.
  3. (US, Canada, regional) In making maple sugar, to complete the process of boiling down the syrup till it is thick enough to crystallize; to approach or reach the state of granulation; with the preposition off.
  4. (entomology) To apply sugar to trees or plants in order to catch moths.
  5. (programming, transitive) To rewrite (source code) using syntactic sugar.
    • 2002, "Jonathan Bromley", Fixed point arithmetic (on newsgroup comp.arch.fpga)
      You can sugar the syntax of constants thus: []
    • 2006, "Neil Madden", Re: Closures (on newsgroup comp.lang.tcl)
      Sure, you could sugar the latter to look like the former (effectively implementing closures as objects), but it seems simpler to just allow the former.
  6. (transitive) To compliment (a person).
  7. To remove hair using a paste of sugar, water, and lemon juice.

Synonyms

  • (add sugar to): sweeten
  • (make less unpleasant): sweeten, sugar-coat

Derived terms

Translations

Interjection

sugar

  1. (informal, euphemistic) Used in place of shit!

Derived terms

  • sugar honey ice tea

Translations

See also

  • glyco-
  • -ose

Anagrams

  • Argus, Guras, argus, gaurs, guars, ragus, ragùs

Basque

Etymology

From su +‎ gar.

Noun

sugar inan

  1. flame

Galician

Alternative forms

  • chuchar, suchar, zugar

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *sucāre, from Latin sugere, present active infinitive of sugō, from Proto-Indo-European *sug-, *suk-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [suˈɣaɾ]

Verb

sugar (first-person singular present sugo, first-person singular preterite suguei, past participle sugado)

  1. to suck
    • 1858, O Seor Pedro, Romance Gallego.... Santiago: Imprenta de Manuel Mirás, page 2:
      Deixáradesme ir pra terra, pra que as miñocas as tripas e os ósos me esfuracasen e me sugasen axiña
      You'll let me go to the earth, so that promptly the earthworms drill and suck my guts and bones

Conjugation

  • Note: sug- are changed to sugu- before front vowels (e).

Derived terms

  • sugota

Related terms

  • samesuga

References

  • “semesuga” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “sugar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “sugar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “zugar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Ido

Etymology

Borrowed from German saugen and Latin sūgere, present active infinitive of sūgō, and to some extent English suck.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suˈɡar/

Verb

sugar (present tense sugas, past tense sugis, future tense sugos, imperative sugez, conditional sugus)

  1. (transitive) to suck (candy, etc., something from something)

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • suganta (sucking; (zool.) suctorial)
  • sugilo (sucker (as of an insect))
  • mamsugar (to suckle)

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsuː.ɡar/, [ˈs̠uːɡär]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈsu.ɡar/, [ˈsuːɡär]

Verb

sūgar

  1. first-person singular future passive indicative of sūgō

Portuguese

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *sucāre, from Latin sugere, present active infinitive of sugō, from Proto-Indo-European *sug-, *suk-.

Verb

sugar (first-person singular present indicative sugo, past participle sugado)

  1. to suck

Conjugation


Romanian

Etymology

From suge (to suck) +‎ -ar. Compare Dalmatian sugol (lamb).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suˈɡar/

Adjective

sugar m or n (feminine singular sugară, masculine plural sugari, feminine and neuter plural sugare)

  1. suckling

Declension

Noun

sugar m (plural sugari, feminine equivalent sugară)

  1. unweaned baby, newborn
  2. suckling, young mammal that hasn't weaned yet

Declension

Synonyms

  • sugaci

Venetian

Etymology

From Latin exsūcāre, present active infinitive of exsūcō (I juice; I dry) (compare Italian asciugare, Friulian suiâ).

Verb

sugar

  1. (transitive) to wipe, dry

Conjugation

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Related terms

  • sugaman

See also

  • suto

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.