salt

salt

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of salt in English

English Online Dictionary. What means salt‎? What does salt mean?

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English salt, from Old English sealt, from Proto-West Germanic *salt, from Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls (salt). Doublet of sal.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: sŏlt, IPA(key): /sɒlt/
    • (Conservative RP) enPR: sôlt, IPA(key): /sɔːlt/
  • (US) enPR: sôlt, sält, IPA(key): /sɔlt/, /sɑlt/
  • (General New Zealand) enPR: sŏlt, IPA(key): /sɔlt/, [sɔɯ̯t]
  • Rhymes: -ɒlt

Noun

salt (countable and uncountable, plural salts)

  1. A common substance, chemically consisting mainly of sodium chloride (NaCl), used extensively as a condiment and preservative.
    • c. 1430 (reprinted 1888), Thomas Austin, ed., Two Fifteenth-century Cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430), & Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450), with Extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429, Laud ms. 553, & Douce ms. 55 [Early English Text Society, Original Series; 91], London: N. Trübner & Co. for the Early English Text Society, volume I, OCLC 374760, page 11:
      Soupes dorye. — Take gode almaunde mylke [] caste þher-to Safroun an Salt []
  2. (chemistry) One of the compounds formed from the reaction of an acid with a base, where a positive ion replaces a hydrogen of the acid.
  3. (uncommon) A salt marsh, a saline marsh at the shore of a sea.
  4. (slang) A sailor (also old salt).
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, chapter 1
      I never go as a passenger; nor, though I am something of a salt, do I ever go to sea as a Commodore, or a Captain, or a Cook.
  5. (cryptography) Randomly chosen bytes added to a plaintext message prior to encrypting or hashing it, in order to render brute-force decryption more difficult.
  6. A person who seeks employment at a company in order to (once employed by it) help unionize it.
  7. (obsolete) Flavour; taste; seasoning.
  8. (obsolete) Piquancy; wit; sense.
    Attic salt
  9. (obsolete) A dish for salt at table; a salt cellar.
    • I out and bought some things; among others, a dozen of silver salts.
  10. (figuratively) Skepticism and common sense.
    Any politician's statements must be taken with a grain of salt, but his need to be taken with a whole shaker of salt.
  11. (Internet slang) Indignation; outrage; arguing.
    There was so much salt in that thread about the poor casting decision.
  12. (Britain, historical) The money demanded by Eton schoolboys during the montem.
Synonyms
  • sal (obsolete)
Derived terms
Related terms
  • salary
Translations

Adjective

salt (comparative more salt, superlative most salt)

  1. Salty; salted.
  2. Saline.
  3. Related to salt deposits, excavation, processing or use.
    The salt factory is a key connecting element in the seawater infrastructure.
  4. (figuratively, obsolete) Bitter; sharp; pungent.
    • c. 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act III, Scene 4,[1]
      I have a salt and sorry rheum offends me;
  5. (figuratively, obsolete) Salacious; lecherous; lustful; (of animals) in heat.
    • 1653, Thomas Urquhart (translator), The First Book of the works of Mr. Francis Rabelais, Book 2, Chapter 22, p. 153,[2]
      And when he saw that all the dogs were flocking about her, yarring at the retardment of their accesse to her, and every way keeping such a coyle with her, as they are wont to do about a proud or salt bitch, he forthwith departed []
  6. (colloquial, archaic) Costly; expensive.
Derived terms
  • saltness
  • salt spray
Translations

Verb

salt (third-person singular simple present salts, present participle salting, simple past and past participle salted)

  1. (transitive) To add salt to.
    to salt fish, beef, or pork; to salt the city streets in the winter
  2. (intransitive) To deposit salt as a saline solution.
    The brine begins to salt.
  3. To fill with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for the preservation of the timber.
  4. To insert or inject something into an object to give it properties it would not naturally have.
    1. (mining) To blast metal into (as a portion of a mine) in order to cause to appear to be a productive seam.
    2. (archaeology) To add bogus evidence to an archeological site.
    3. (transitive) To add certain chemical elements to (a nuclear weapon) so that it generates more radiation.
      • 1964, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, The Effects of Nuclear Weapons (page 417)
        The composition of the fallout can also be changed by "salting" the weapon to be detonated. This consists in the inclusion of significant quantities of certain elements, possibly enriched in specific isotopes, for the purpose of producing induced radioactivity. There are several reasons why a weapon might be salted.
  5. (transitive) To sprinkle throughout.
    They salted the document with arcane language.
    • 1993, The Journal of Jewish Thought & Philosophy (page 154)
      These were pamphlets, often written in various Jewish vernaculars, describing the location of the Holy sites and salting the accounts with mythic and homiletical materials.
  6. (cryptography) To add filler bytes before encrypting, in order to make brute-force decryption more resource-intensive.
  7. To render a thing useless.
    1. (military, transitive) To sow with salt (of land), symbolizing a curse on its re-inhabitation.
      In this place were put to the ground and salted the houses of José Mascarenhas.
    2. (wiki) to lock a page so it cannot be created
Antonyms
  • (add salt): desalt
Derived terms
  • desalt
  • salt away
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin saltus.

Noun

salt (plural salts)

  1. (obsolete) A bounding, leaping, prance.
    • 1616, Ben Jonson, The Devil Is an Ass, in Gifford’s 1816 edition volume V page 67

Anagrams

  • Alts, LTAs, TLAs, alts, last, lats, slat

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan sal, from Latin saltus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈsalt/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈsal/

Noun

salt m (plural salts)

  1. jump
  2. waterfall

Derived terms

  • saltiró

Related terms

  • saltar

Further reading

  • “salt” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Crimean Gothic

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Noun

salt

  1. salt
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Salt. Sal.

Czech

Noun

salt

  1. genitive plural of salto

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse saltr (salt), from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls, *sáls.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /salˀd/, [sælˀd̥], [sælˀt]

Adjective

salt

  1. salty, salt
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Old Norse salt (akin to Old Saxon salt, Old High German salz, Old Dutch salt, Old English sealt), from Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls. Compare Icelandic, Norwegian, and Swedish salt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /salˀt/, [sæ̝lˀt]

Noun

salt n (singular definite saltet, plural indefinite salte)

  1. salt
Inflection

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

salt

  1. imperative of salte
Related terms
  • salte
  • mineralsalt

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sal̥t]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse salt, from Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls, *sáls.

Noun

salt n (genitive singular salts, plural sølt)

  1. salt
Declension
Related terms
  • pipar
  • edikur
  • sinnopur
  • olivinolja
  • epli
  • pannukøka
  • rosina
  • sukur
  • drúvusukur
  • vaniljusukur
  • súltusukur
  • siropur

Etymology 2

From Old Norse saltr (salt), from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls, *sáls.

Adjective

salt

  1. salty
Declension

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin saltus.

Noun

salt m (plural salts)

  1. jump, leap, spring

Related terms

  • saltâ

Gothic

Romanization

salt

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌰𐌻𐍄

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse salt, from Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls, *sáls.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sal̥t/
  • Rhymes: -al̥t

Noun

salt n (genitive singular salts, nominative plural sölt)

  1. salt
    Geturðu rétt mér saltið?
    Can you pass me the salt?

Declension

Derived terms

  • salta
  • saltstaukur
  • saltsýra
  • vega salt

Adjective

salt

  1. positive degree neuter singular nominative/accusative of saltur

Latvian

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (cold; hot). Cognates include Lithuanian šálti.

Pronunciation

Verb

salt (intr., 1st conj., pres. salstu, salsti, salst, past salu)

  1. to freeze

Declension


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • selt, sealt, salte, zalt, saulte, sawt, scealte

Etymology

From Old English sealt, from Proto-Germanic *saltą (noun) and Proto-Germanic *saltaz (adjective).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /salt/, /sɛlt/

Noun

salt (uncountable)

  1. salt (sodium chloride)
  2. Something containing or for storing salt
  3. Any of a group of crystalline compounds that resemble salt

Related terms

  • salten
  • salthous

Descendants

  • English: salt
  • Scots: sawt, salt, saut
  • Yola: zall

References

  • “salt, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-08.

Adjective

salt (plural and weak singular salte, comparative salter, superlative saltest)

  1. salty, tasting of salt
  2. salted, coated in salt

Descendants

  • English: salt
  • Scots: sawt, salt, saut

References

  • “salt, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-08.

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse saltr.

Adjective

salt (neuter singular salt, definite singular and plural salte, comparative saltere, indefinite superlative saltest, definite superlative salteste)

  1. salty, salt, salted
    salte peanøtter - salted peanuts

Etymology 2

From Old Norse salt (akin to Old Saxon salt, Old High German salz, Old Dutch salt, Old English sealt), from Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls. Compare Danish, Swedish and Icelandic salt.

Noun

salt n (definite singular saltet, indefinite plural salter, definite plural salta or saltene)

  1. salt

Etymology 3

Verb

salt

  1. imperative of salte

Derived terms

References

  • “salt” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑlt/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse saltr.

Adjective

salt (neuter singular salt, definite singular and plural salte, comparative saltare, indefinite superlative saltast, definite superlative saltaste)

  1. salty, salt, salted

Etymology 2

From Old Norse salt (akin to Old Saxon salt, Old High German salz, Old Dutch salt, Old English sealt), from Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls.

Noun

salt n (definite singular saltet, indefinite plural salt, definite plural salta)

  1. salt

Derived terms

References

  • “salt” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse salt.

Noun

salt n

  1. salt
Descendants
  • Danish: salt

Etymology 2

From Old Norse saltr.

Adjective

salt

  1. salty, salt
Descendants
  • Danish: salt

Old Frisian

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *saltą (salt), *saltaz (salty, salted).

Noun

salt n

  1. salt

Inflection

Descendants

  • North Frisian: saalt
  • Saterland Frisian: Soalt, Saalt
  • West Frisian: sâlt

Adjective

salt

  1. salty, salted

Descendants

  • West Frisian: sâlt

Old Norse

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *saltą.

Noun

salt n

  1. salt
Declension
Related terms
  • salta (to salt)
  • saltr (salty)
Descendants

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective

salt

  1. strong neuter nominative/accusative singular of saltr (salty)

References

  • salt in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin saltus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsalt/

Noun

salt n (plural salturi)

  1. leap
  2. saltation

Declension

Related terms

  • sălta
  • săltare
  • săltat
  • săltăreț
  • săltător
  • săltătură

Verb

salt

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of sălta

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish salter, from Old Norse saltr, from Proto-Germanic *saltaz, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls, *sáls.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /salt/

Adjective

salt (comparative saltare, superlative saltast)

  1. salty
Declension

Etymology 2

From Old Swedish salt, from Old Norse salt (akin to Old Saxon salt, Old High German salz, Old Dutch salt, Old English sealt), from Proto-Germanic *saltą, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls. Compare Danish, Icelandic, Norwegian salt.

Noun

salt n

  1. salt
    1. (uncountable) sodium chloride (NaCl), used extensively as a condiment and preservative.
    2. (chemistry) One of the compounds formed from the reaction of an acid with a base, where a positive ion replaces a hydrogen of the acid.
Declension
Synonyms
  • bordssalt
Derived terms
  • bergsalt
  • havssalt
  • medelhavssalt
  • saltlake
  • saltkristall
  • saltstänkt
  • saltsyra
Related terms
  • salta
  • sälta

Anagrams

  • last, lats, stal, tals

Turkish

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic *sal- (unleash).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saɫt/

Adverb

salt

  1. exclusively, only, just, absolute
    Synonyms: bir, sade, sadece, sırf, tek, yalnız, yalnızca

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