sage

sage

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of sage in English

English Online Dictionary. What means sage‎? What does sage mean?

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seɪdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English sage, from Old French sage (11th century), from Latin *sapius, from Latin sapere (to taste, to discern, to be wise), from Proto-Indo-European *sap- (to taste). The noun meaning "man of profound wisdom" is recorded from circa 1300. Originally applied to the Seven Sages of Greece.

Adjective

sage (comparative sager, superlative sagest)

  1. Wise.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      All you sage counsellors, hence!
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      commanders, who, cloaking their fear under show of sage advice, counselled the general to retreat
  2. (obsolete) grave; serious; solemn
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      [Great bards] in sage and solemn tunes have sung.
Synonyms
  • (wise): See Thesaurus:wise
  • (grave): See Thesaurus:serious
Translations

Noun

sage (plural sages)

  1. A wise person or spiritual teacher; a man or woman of gravity and wisdom, especially, a teacher venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave or stoic philosopher.
Synonyms
  • (wise person): See Thesaurus:sage
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See also

  • rishi
  • maharishi

Etymology 2

From Middle English sauge, from Middle French sauge, from Old French salje, from Latin salvia, from salvus (healthy), see safe.

Noun

sage (uncountable)

  1. The plant Salvia officinalis and savory spice produced from it; also planted for ornamental purposes.
  2. Any plant in the genus Salvia
  3. Any of a number of plants such as sagebrush considered to be similar to Salvia officinalis, mostly because they are small shrubs and have gray foliage or are aromatic.
Synonyms
  • (Salvia): ramona
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • salvia

Further reading

  • Salvia officinalis on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Salvia officinalis on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Japanese 下げる (sageru, to lower).

Pronunciation

  • Etymologically /sɑɡɛ/, but often /seɪdʒ/ due to its English homograph.

Interjection

sage

  1. (Internet slang) Word used in the email field of imageboards to prevent a bump of the post. Used as an option rather than a word in some imageboard software.

Verb

sage (third-person singular simple present sages, present participle saging, simple past and past participle saged)

  1. (Internet slang) The act of using the word or option sage in the email field or a checkbox of an imageboard when posting a reply.
Derived terms
  • polite sage

Usage notes

  • This word is specific to imageboards. The original purpose of sage is to not bump a thread if one deems another's (often OP's) own post to be of little value.

Anagrams

  • Sega, ages, geas, sega

Central Franconian

Alternative forms

  • san, son (Moselle Franconian)

Etymology

From Old High German sagēn, from Proto-Germanic *sagjaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈzaːɣə/

Verb

sage (third-person singular present tense sät, past tense sat or sät, past participle jesat or jesät)

  1. (Ripuarian) to say; to tell

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

sage f (plural sagen)

  1. story of heraldry and valor, a saga.

Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *sakeda.

Adjective

sage (genitive sageda, partitive sagedat)

  1. frequent

Declension


French

Etymology

From Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapius from the Classical Latin verb sapiō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saʒ/
  • Rhymes: -aʒ

Adjective

sage (plural sages)

  1. (of a person) wise: prudent, cautious, and judicious
  2. (of a woman) Chaste, modest, irreproachable in conduct
  3. (of a child) Good, well-behaved, not naughty

Derived terms

  • sage comme une image

Noun

sage m, f (plural sages)

  1. A person who is prudent, cautious, and judicious
  2. A sage (person)

Further reading

  • “sage” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ages, âges, âgés

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈzaːɡə/

Verb

sage

  1. First-person singular present of sagen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of sagen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of sagen.
  4. Imperative singular of sagen.

Hausa

Verb

sagḕ (grade 4)

  1. to become stiff or paralyzed

Latin

Adjective

sāge

  1. vocative masculine singular of sāgus

Noun

sage m

  1. singular vocative of sagus

sage n

  1. singular vocative of sagum

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapius, from sapiō. Some forms have been altered on the basis of other words with forms in -a- and -au-.

Alternative forms

  • sauge, sawge

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsaːdʒ(ə)/

Noun

sage (plural sages)

  1. A sage; a person who serves as a fount of wisdom and knowledge.
Descendants
  • English: sage
  • Scots: sage
References
  • “sāǧe (n.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-29.

Adjective

sage

  1. Sage, considered, well thought-out.
  2. Learned, schooled, educated; having much knowledge.
Descendants
  • English: sage
  • Scots: sage
References
  • “sāǧe (adj.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-29.

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Middle French sauge.

Noun

sage

  1. Alternative form of sauge

Norman

Etymology

From Old French sage, from Vulgar Latin *sapius, from Latin sapiō, sapere (to taste; to discern; to be wise), from Proto-Indo-European *sap- (to taste).

Adjective

sage m, f

  1. (Jersey) wise

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

sage (imperative sag, present tense sager, simple past saga or saget or sagde, past participle saga or saget or sagd, present participle sagende)

  1. to saw (cut something with a saw)

Related terms

  • sag (noun)

References

  • “sage” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Old French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *sapius from the Classical Latin verb sapiō.

Adjective

sage m (oblique and nominative feminine singular sage)

  1. wise (having wisdom)

Descendants

  • English: sage
  • French: sage
  • Italian: saggio

Sathmar Swabian

Etymology

From Old High German sagēn, from Proto-Germanic *sagjaną.

Verb

sage

  1. to say

References

  • Claus Stephani, Volksgut der Sathmarschwaben (1985)

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.