race

race

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of race in English

English Online Dictionary. What means race‎? What does race mean?

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rās, IPA(key): /ɹeɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Etymology 1

From Middle English race, from Old Norse rás (a running, race), from Proto-Germanic *rēsō (a course), from Proto-Indo-European *reh₁s- (to flow, rush). Akin to Old English rǣs (a race, swift or violent running, rush, onset), Middle Low German râs (a strong current), Dutch ras (a strong whirling current). Compare Danish ræs, Norwegian and Swedish ras, Norwegian rås.

Noun

race (countable and uncountable, plural races)

  1. A contest between people, animals, vehicles, etc. where the goal is to be the first to reach some objective. Example: Several horses run in a horse race, and the first one to reach the finishing post wins
  2. Swift progress; rapid motion; an instance of moving or driving at high speed.
  3. (computing) A race condition.
  4. A progressive movement toward a goal.
  5. A fast-moving current of water, such as that which powers a mill wheel.
  6. A water channel, esp. one built to lead water to or from a point where it is utilised.
  7. Competitive action of any kind, especially when prolonged; hence, career; course of life.
  8. The bushings of a rolling element bearing which contacts the rolling elements.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

race (third-person singular simple present races, present participle racing, simple past and past participle raced)

  1. (intransitive) To take part in a race (in the sense of a contest).
  2. (transitive) To compete against in such a race.
  3. (intransitive) To move or drive at high speed; to hurry or speed.
  4. (intransitive) Of a motor, to run rapidly when not engaged to a transmission.
    • 1891 (December) Arthur Conan Doyle, The Man with the Twisted Lip:
      "My mind is like a racing engine, tearing itself to pieces because it is not connected up with the work for which it was built."
Translations

Etymology 2

1560s, via Middle French race from Italian razza (early 14th century), of uncertain origin.

Noun

race (countable and uncountable, plural races)

  1. A group of sentient beings, particularly people, distinguished by common ancestry, heritage or characteristics:
    1. A large group of people distinguished from others on the basis of a common heritage (compare ethnic group). See Wikipedia's article on historical definitions of race.
      • 1838, Lincoln, Abraham, Young Men's Lyceum address
        We toiled not in the acquirement or establishment of them—they are a legacy bequeathed us, by a once hardy, brave, and patriotic, but now lamented and departed race of ancestors.
      • 1895 November 11, Chamberlain, Joseph, Speech given to the Imperial Institute:
        I believe that the British race is the greatest of the governing races that the world has ever seen.
      • 1913, Martin Van Buren Knox, The religious life of the Anglo-Saxon race
    2. A large group of people distinguished from others on the basis of common physical characteristics, such as skin color or hair type.
    3. A large group of sentient beings distinguished from others on the basis of a common heritage (compare species, subspecies).
      • 1898, Herman Isidore Stern, The gods of our fathers: a study of Saxon mythology, page 15)
        There are two distinct races of gods known to Norse mythology[.]
    4. A group or category distinguished from others on the basis of shared characteristics or qualities, for example social qualities.
  2. (biology) A population geographically separated from others of its species that develops significantly different characteristics; a mating group.
  3. (zoology) Subspecies.
  4. (animal husbandry) A breed or strain of domesticated animal.
  5. (mycology, bacteriology, informal) An infraspecific rank, a pathotype, pathovar, etc.
  6. (obsolete) Peculiar flavour, taste, or strength, as of wine; that quality, or assemblage of qualities, which indicates origin or kind, as in wine; hence, characteristic flavour.
  7. (obsolete) Characteristic quality or disposition.
Synonyms
  • subspecies
  • breed
  • variety
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

race (third-person singular simple present races, present participle racing, simple past and past participle raced)

  1. To assign a race to; to perceive as having a (usually specified) race.
    • 1996, Philosophical Studies in Education, page 151:
      To be raced as black in the U.S. translates symbolically into being considered inferior to whites, lazy, immoral, boisterous, violent, and sexually promiscuous.
    • 2006, Athena D. Mutua, Progressive Black Masculinities?, Routledge (→ISBN), page 30:
      From this perspective, the project of progressive blackness entails the edification of black people and the elimination of all forms of domination that limit this edification for all those raced as black.
    • 2008, George Yancy, Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race, Rowman & Littlefield (→ISBN), page 46:
      By avoiding being raced as white, whites are able to maintain the illusion that they have always been individuals, that they have always accomplished their achievements through merit alone.
    • 2020 March 24, Sophie Lewis, The coronavirus crisis shows it's time to abolish the family:
      [T]he private family qua mode of social reproduction still, frankly, sucks. It genders, nationalizes and races us. It norms us for productive work.

Etymology 3

From Middle French [Term?], from Latin radix.

Noun

race (plural races)

  1. A rhizome or root, especially of ginger.
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, Act IV, Scene III, line 45.
      I must have saffron to color the warden pies; mace; dates, none -- that's out of my note; nutmegs, seven; a race or two of ginger, but that I may beg; four pounds of prunes, and as many of raisins o' th' sun.
Translations

Etymology 4

Verb

race (third-person singular simple present races, present participle racing, simple past and past participle raced)

  1. Obsolete form of raze.

References

  • race at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • race in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • race in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Diez, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der romanischen Sprachen, "Razza."

Anagrams

  • -care, Acre, CERA, Care, Cera, Crea, acer, acre, care, e-car

Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French race, from Italian razza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʁɑːsə]

Noun

race c (singular definite racen, plural indefinite racer)

  1. race (subdivision of species)
  2. breed
Inflection

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English race.

Alternative forms

  • ræs

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɹɛjs], [ˈʁɛˀs]

Noun

race n (singular definite racet, plural indefinite race)

  1. a race (a contest where the goal is to be the first to reach some objective)
  2. a rush
Inflection

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English race.

Alternative forms

  • ræse

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʁɛːsə]

Verb

race (imperative race, infinitive at race, present tense racer, past tense racede, perfect tense er/har racet)

  1. to race (to compete in a race, a contest where the goal is to be the first to reach some objective)
  2. to rush

Further reading

  • race on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /reːs/
  • Hyphenation: race
  • Rhymes: -eːs
  • Homophone: rees

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English race.

Noun

race m (plural races, diminutive raceje n)

  1. A speed contest, a race.
    Synonym: wedloop
Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

race

  1. first-person singular present indicative of racen
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of racen
  3. imperative of racen

French

Etymology

As Middle French rasse "entirety of ancestors and descendants of the same family or people", from ca. 1480, spelling Middle French race recorded in 1549, from Italian razza (13th century), of uncertain origin (more at razza).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁas/
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

race f (plural races)

  1. race (classification)
  2. kind
    Synonym: espèce
  3. (zoology) breed

Related terms

Descendants

  • German: Rasse
    • Czech: rasa
    • Polish: rasa
    • Serbo-Croatian: rasa
    • Slovene: rasa

References

  • “race” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Further reading

  • “race” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • acre, âcre, care, caré, créa, racé

Middle French

Etymology

16th century (spelling rasse from 1480), from Italian razza (early 14th century), of uncertain origin.

Noun

race f (plural races)

  1. race; breed

Descendants


Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈra.t͡sɛ/

Noun

race f

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of raca

Swedish

Etymology

From English race.

Noun

race n

  1. race (competition)

Declension

Derived terms

  • köra sitt eget race

References

  • race in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • race in Svensk ordbok (SO)

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.