pace

pace

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of pace in English

English Online Dictionary. What means pace‎? What does pace mean?

English

Etymology 1

Borrowed into Middle English from Anglo-Norman pas, Old French pas, and their source, Latin passus. Doublet of pas; cf. also pass. Cognate with Spanish pasear.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /peɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Noun

pace (plural paces)

  1. Step.
    1. A step taken with the foot. [from 14th century]
    2. The distance covered in a step (or sometimes two), either vaguely or according to various specific set measurements. [from 14th century]
  2. Way of stepping.
    1. A manner of walking, running or dancing; the rate or style of how someone moves with their feet. [from 14th century]
    2. Any of various gaits of a horse, specifically a 2-beat, lateral gait. [from 15th century]
  3. Speed or velocity in general. [from 15th century]
  4. (cricket) A measure of the hardness of a pitch and of the tendency of a cricket ball to maintain its speed after bouncing. [from 19th century]
  5. (collective) A group of donkeys.
    • 1952, G. B. Stern, The Donkey Shoe, The Macmillan Company (1952), page 29:
      [] but at Broadstairs and other places along the coast, a pace of donkeys stood on the sea-shore expectant (at least, their owners were expectant) of children clamouring to ride.
    • 2006, "Drop the dead donkeys", The Economist, 9 November 2006:
      A pace of donkeys fans out in different directions.
    • 2007, Elinor De Wire, The Lightkeepers' Menagerie: Stories of Animals at Lighthouses, Pineapple Press (2007), →ISBN, page 200:
      Like a small farm, the lighthouse compound had its chattering of chicks, pace of donkeys, troop of horses, and fold of sheep.
  6. (obsolete) Passage, route.
    1. (obsolete) One's journey or route. [14th-18th century]
    2. (obsolete) A passage through difficult terrain; a mountain pass or route vulnerable to ambush etc. [14th-17th century]
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
        But when she saw them gone she forward went, / As lay her journey, through that perlous Pace [...].
    3. (obsolete) An aisle in a church. [15th-19th century]
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

pace (not comparable)

  1. (cricket) Describing a bowler who bowls fast balls.

Verb

pace (third-person singular simple present paces, present participle pacing, simple past and past participle paced)

  1. To walk back and forth in a small distance.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter V
      Groups of men, in all imaginable attitudes, were lying, standing, sitting, or pacing up and down.
  2. To set the speed in a race. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. To measure by walking.
Derived terms
  • (set the speed in a race): pacemaker
Translations

Etymology 2

From Latin pāce (in peace), ablative form of pāx (peace).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpætʃeɪ/, /ˈpɑːtʃeɪ/, /ˈpeɪsiː/

Preposition

pace

  1. (formal) With all due respect to.
Usage notes

Used when expressing a contrary opinion, in formal speech or writing.

Translations

Etymology 3

Alteration of archaic Pasch.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /peɪs/

Noun

pace (plural paces)

  1. Easter.
Derived terms
  • pace egg

References

Anagrams

  • APEC, CAPE, Cape, EAPC, EPAC, EPCA, PECA, cape

Esperanto

Etymology

paco +‎ -e

Pronunciation

Adverb

pace

  1. peacefully

Galician

Verb

pace

  1. third-person singular present indicative of pacer
  2. second-person singular imperative of pacer

Interlingua

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.tse/

Noun

pace (uncountable)

  1. peace

Italian

Etymology

From Latin pācem, accusative of pāx (peace), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.t͡ʃe/
  • Hyphenation: pà‧ce

Noun

pace f (plural paci)

  1. peace

Adverb

pace

  1. (colloquial) peace be with you; that's it; end of the story

Related terms

Anagrams

  • cape

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈpaː.ke/, [ˈpäːkɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈpa.t͡ʃe/, [ˈpɑːt͡ʃɛ]

Noun

pāce

  1. ablative singular of pāx

Middle English

Verb

pace

  1. proceed; go forward
    • 1387-1410, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, General Prologue
      Er that I ferther in this tale pace, / Me thynketh it acordaunt to resoun / To telle yow al the condicioun / Of ech of hem, so as it semed me, / And whiche they weren, and of what degree []

Pali

Alternative forms

Verb

pace

  1. first-person singular present/imperative middle of pacati (to cook)
  2. singular optative active of pacati (to cook)

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.t͡sɛ/

Noun

pace m anim

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of pac

Noun

pace f

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of paca

Noun

pace f

  1. dative/locative singular of paka

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin pācem, accusative of pāx (peace), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂ǵ-.

Noun

pace f (uncountable)

  1. peace

Declension

Antonyms

  • război

Derived terms

  • pașnic

Related terms

  • împăca

See also

  • liniște

Spanish

Verb

pace

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of pacer.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of pacer.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of pacer.

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.