name

name

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of name in English

English Online Dictionary. What means name‎? What does name mean?

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English name, nome, from Old English nama, noma (name; noun; the particular word used to denote any object of thought not considered in a purely individual character; title; reputation; the reputation of some character or attribute; the mere appellation in contrast or opposition to the actual person or thing), from Proto-Germanic *namô (name), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥ (name). Cognate with Scots name, naim, nem (name), North Frisian Neem, Naam, nööm, noome (name), Saterland Frisian Noome (name), West Frisian namme (name), Dutch naam (name), Low German Name (name), German Name (name), Danish navn (name), Norwegian Bokmål navn (name), Norwegian Nynorsk namn (name), Swedish namn (name), Icelandic nafn (name), Latin nōmen (name). Doublet of noun. See also neven.

The verb is from Old English namian, from Proto-Germanic *nōmōjaną, derived from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: nām, IPA(key): /neɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Noun

name (plural names)

  1. Any nounal word or phrase which indicates a particular person, place, class, or thing.
    Synonyms: proper name; see also Thesaurus:name
    • Bible, Genesis ii. 19
      Whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.
    • Shakespeare
      That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet.
    • 1904, L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz:
      So good a man as this must surely have a name.
  2. Reputation.
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, III-iii:
      Good name in man and woman, dear my lord / Is the immediate jewel of their souls.[1]
    • 1952, Old Testament, Revised Standard Version, Thomas Nelson & Sons, 2 Samuel 8:13:
      And David won a name for himself.[2]
  3. An abusive or insulting epithet.
  4. A person (or legal person).
    • Dryden
      They list with women each degenerate name.
    • p. 2002, second edition of, 2002, Graham Richards, Putting Psychology in its Place, →ISBN, page 287 [3]:
      Later British psychologists interested in this topic include such major names as Cyril Burt, William McDougall, [] .
    • 2008 edition of, 1998, S. B. Budhiraja and M. B. Athreya, Cases in Strategic Management, →ISBN page 79 [4]:
      Would it be able to fight the competition from ITC Agro Tech and Liptons who were ready and able to commit large resources? With such big names as competitors, would this business be viable for Marico?
    • 2009 third edition of, 1998, Martin Mowforth and Ian Munt, Tourism and Sustainability, →ISBN, page 29 [5]:
      International non-governmental organisations (INGOs), including such household names as Amnesty International, Greenpeace and [] .
  5. Those of a certain name; a race; a family.
    • Macaulay
      The ministers of the republic, mortal enemies of his name, came every day to pay their feigned civilities.
  6. (computing) A unique identifier, generally a string of characters.
  7. (Britain, finance) An investor in Lloyds of London bearing unlimited liability.
  8. Authority.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • anonymous
  • cognomen
  • namely
  • nom de guerre
  • nom de plume
  • nominal
  • pseudonym
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: nen
  • Japanese: ネーム
Translations
References
  • name on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

name (third-person singular simple present names, present participle naming, simple past and past participle named)

  1. (transitive) To give a name to.
  2. (transitive) To mention, specify.
  3. (transitive) To identify as relevant or important
  4. (transitive) To publicly implicate.
  5. (transitive) To designate for a role.
  6. (transitive, Westminster system politics) To initiate a process to temporarily remove a member of parliament who is breaking the rules of conduct.
Synonyms
  • (give a name to): bename, designate, dub; see also Thesaurus:denominate
Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • christen
  • epithet
  • moniker
  • sobriquet

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Spanish ñame, substituting n for the unfamiliar Spanish letter ñ.

Noun

name (plural names)

  1. Any of several types of true yam (Dioscorea) used in Caribbean Spanish cooking.
Synonyms
  • cush-cush
Translations

Anagrams

  • -mane, -nema, Amen, Eman, Enma, MEAN, MENA, Mena, NEMA, NMEA, amen, mane, mean, mnae, neam

Afrikaans

Noun

name

  1. plural of naam

Central Malay

Etymology

Borrowed from Sanskrit नामन् (nāman).

Noun

name

  1. name

References

  • Greenhill, S.J., Blust. R, & Gray, R.D. (2008). The Austronesian Basic Vocabulary Database: From Bioinformatics to Lexomics. Evolutionary Bioinformatics, 4:271-283.

Cimbrian

Noun

name ?

  1. (Thirteen Communities) name

References

  • “name” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

name

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of nemen

Anagrams

  • amen, mane

Eastern Arrernte

Noun

name

  1. grass

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Japanese

Romanization

name

  1. Rōmaji transcription of なめ

Kurdish

Etymology

Borrowed from Persian نامه(name).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɑːmɛ/

Noun

name f

  1. letter (a document)

Lithuanian

Noun

name m

  1. locative singular of namas
  2. vocative singular of namas

Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch namo, from Proto-Germanic *namô.

Noun

nāme m or f

  1. name
  2. fame, reputation
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms
  • nāmen
Descendants
  • Dutch: naam
  • Limburgish: naam, naom

Etymology 2

From Old Dutch *nāma, from Proto-Germanic *nēmō.

Noun

nâme f

  1. taking
  2. receiving
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Related terms
  • nēmen
Descendants
  • Dutch: name (mostly in compounds)

Further reading

  • “name”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “name (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • “name (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • nome

Etymology

From Old English nama.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /naːm(ə)/

Noun

name (plural names or namen)

  1. name

Descendants

  • English: name
  • Scots: name, naim, nem, nome

Volapük

Noun

name

  1. dative singular of nam

Zazaki

Etymology

Compare Middle Persian 𐫗𐫀𐫖(nʾm /nām/).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɔːme/

Noun

name (nam?

  1. name
  2. reputation

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.