lack

lack

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of lack in English

English Online Dictionary. What means lack‎? What does lack mean?

English

Etymology

Middle English, cognate with or from Middle Low German lak, Middle Dutch lac (deficiency) and Middle Dutch laken (blame, lack); all ultimately from Proto-Germanic *laka-, related to *lak(k)ōn- (to blame, reproach), from Proto-Indo-European *lok-néh₂-. See also Dutch lak (calumny), Old Norse lakr (lacking).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /lak/
  • (US) IPA(key): /læk/
  • Rhymes: -æk

Noun

lack (countable and uncountable, plural lacks)

  1. (obsolete) A defect or failing; moral or spiritual degeneracy.
  2. A deficiency or need (of something desirable or necessary); an absence, want.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act IV, Scene 1,[1]
      [] let his lack of years be no impediment to let him lack a reverend estimation;
    • 1994, Green Day, Basket Case
      I went to a shrink, to analyze my dreams. He said it's lack of sex that's bringing me down.

Antonyms

  • glut
  • surplus

Derived terms

  • lackless

Translations

Verb

lack (third-person singular simple present lacks, present participle lacking, simple past and past participle lacked)

  1. (transitive) To be without, to need, to require.
    My life lacks excitement.
  2. (intransitive) To be short (of or for something).
    He'll never lack for company while he's got all that money.
    • c. 1600,, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act I, Scene 4,[2]
      Hamlet. What hour now?
      Horatio. I think it lacks of twelve.
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To be in want.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Psalm 34.10,[3]
      The young lions do lack, and suffer hunger []
  4. (obsolete) To see the deficiency in (someone or something); to find fault with, to malign, reproach.
    • c. 1385, William Langland, Piers Plowman, II:
      That is Mede þe Mayde quod she · hath noyed me ful oft / And ylakked my lemman.

Related terms

  • lackluster

Translations

Further reading

  • Kroonen, Guus (2013) , “lak(k)on-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 325

Anagrams

  • calk, kcal

German

Pronunciation

Verb

lack

  1. imperative singular of lacken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of lacken

Swedish

Etymology

From French lacre (sealing wax), from Portuguese laca.

Noun

lack n

  1. lacquer

Declension

Related terms

  • klarlack
  • lacknafta
  • lackskor
  • nagellack

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.