jade

jade

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of jade in English

English Online Dictionary. What means jade‎? What does jade mean?

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒeɪd/
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side.).

Noun

jade (usually uncountable, plural jades)

  1. A semiprecious stone, either nephrite or jadeite, generally green or white in color, often used for carving figurines.
  2. A bright shade of slightly bluish or greyish green, typical of polished jade stones.
Synonyms
  • (color): jade green
  • (stone): jadestone / jade stone, yu
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Adjective

jade (not comparable)

  1. Of a grayish shade of green, typical of jade stones.

Etymology 2

From Middle English, either a variant of yaud or merely influenced by it. Yaud derives from Old Norse jalda (mare), from a Uralic language, such as Moksha эльде (elʹde) or Erzya эльде (elʹde). See yaud for more.

Noun

jade (plural jades)

  1. A horse too old to be put to work.
    • 1760, Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, London: R. & J. Dodsley, Volume I, Chapter 10, p. 36,[2]
      Let that be as it may, as my purpose is to do exact justice to every creature brought upon the stage of this dramatic work,—I could not stifle this distinction in favour of Don Quixote’s horse;—in all other points the parson’s horse, I say, was just such another,—for he was as lean, and as lank, and as sorry a jade, as HUMILITY herself could have bestrided.
    • 1817, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, Chapter 11,[3]
      My horse would have trotted to Clifton within the hour, if left to himself, and I have almost broke my arm with pulling him in to that cursed broken-winded jade’s pace.
  2. (especially derogatory) A bad-tempered or disreputable woman.
    • c. 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, Act I, Scene 1,[4]
      You always end with a jade’s trick: I know you of old.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Dublin: John Smith, Volume I, Book I, Chapter 4, p. 14,[5]
      However, what she withheld from the Infant, she bestowed with the utmost Profuseness on the poor unknown Mother, whom she called an impudent Slut, a wanton Hussy, an audacious Harlot, a wicked Jade, a vile Strumpet, with every other Appellation with which the Tongue of Virtue never fails to lash those who bring a Disgrace on the Sex.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 9:
      Sir Pitt Crawley was a philosopher with a taste for what is called low life. His first marriage with the daughter of the noble Binkie had been made under the auspices of his parents; and as he often told Lady Crawley in her lifetime she was such a confounded quarrelsome high-bred jade that when she died he was hanged if he would ever take another of her sort ...
Synonyms
  • (old horse): nag, yaud
  • (bad-tempered woman): See Thesaurus:shrew or Thesaurus:woman
Translations

Verb

jade (third-person singular simple present jades, present participle jading, simple past and past participle jaded)

  1. To tire, weary or fatigue
    • John Locke
      The mind, once jaded by an attempt above its power, [] checks at any vigorous undertaking ever after.
  2. (obsolete) To treat like a jade; to spurn.
  3. (obsolete) To make ridiculous and contemptible.
Synonyms
  • (to tire): See Thesaurus:tire
Derived terms
  • jaded
Translations

References


Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jaːdə/, [ˈjæːð̩]
  • Rhymes: -aːdə

Noun

jade c (singular definite jaden, uncountable)

  1. (mineralogy) jade

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑde

Noun

jade

  1. (mineralogy) jade

Declension


French

Etymology

Rebracketed from earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒad/

Noun

jade m (plural jades)

  1. jade

Further reading

  • “jade” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • déjà

Portuguese

Etymology

From French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -adʒi

Noun

jade m (plural jades)

  1. jade (gem)

Spanish

Etymology

From French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈxa.ðe], [ˈxa.de]
  • See also: jadee

Noun

jade m (plural jades)

  1. (mineralogy) jade

Derived terms

  • jadeíta

Anagrams

  • deja

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.