halo

halo

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of halo in English

English Online Dictionary. What means halo‎? What does halo mean?

English

Etymology

From Latin halōs, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs, threshing floor; disk; disk of the sun or moon; ring of light around the sun or moon), of unknown origin. The threshing floor's circular threshold or oxen walking on it in a circle gave rise to the other meanings. Used in English since 1563; the sense of light around someone’s head since 1646.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈheɪləʊ/
  • (US) enPR: hāʹlō, IPA(key): /ˈheɪloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪləʊ

Noun

halo (plural halos or haloes)

  1. A circular band of coloured light, visible around the sun or moon etc., caused by reflection and refraction of light by ice crystals in the atmosphere.
  2. (astronomy) A cloud of gas and other matter surrounding and captured by the gravitational field of a large diffuse astronomical object, such as a galaxy or cluster of galaxies.
  3. Anything resembling this band, such as an effect caused by imperfect developing of photographs.
  4. (religion) nimbus, a luminous disc, often of gold, around or over the heads of saints, etc., in religious paintings.
  5. The metaphorical aura of glory, veneration or sentiment which surrounds an idealized entity.
  6. (advertising) The bias caused by the halo effect.
    • 2016, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, ‎Health and Medicine Division, ‎Food and Nutrition Board, Food Literacy: How Do Communications and Marketing Impact Consumer Knowledge, Skills, and Behavior? (page 51)
      In both cases, they found that [] there was a halo effect (e.g., when a "low cholesterol" claim was made, consumers perceived other nutrients, such as fat, also to be at low levels when they were actually high). Andrews reported that these misleading halos were reduced only when the claims were accompanied by an evaluative disclosure []
  7. (art, religion, iconography) a circular annulus ring, frequently luminous, often golden, floating above the head
  8. (medicine) A circular brace used to keep the head and neck in position.
  9. (motor racing) A rollbar placed in front of the driver, used to protect the cockpit of a open cockpit racecar.
  10. (automotive) Short for halo headlight.

Synonyms

  • (luminous disc around head of saints in paintings): aureole, nimbus

Derived terms

  • halo effect
  • halo nucleus
  • neutron halo
  • nuclear halo
  • proton halo

Translations

Verb

halo (third-person singular simple present haloes, present participle haloing, simple past and past participle haloed)

  1. (transitive) To encircle with a halo.
    Synonym: inaureole

Related terms

  • halation

Translations

References

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “halo”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • hola

Bikol Central

Etymology 1

Unknown.

Verb

halo (hálo)

  1. to hush, to make or become quiet

Etymology 2

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qahelu.

Noun

halo (hàlo)

  1. a pestle

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *salā (filth, dirt)

Noun

halo m

  1. saliva

References

  • Ranko Matasović (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic[1] (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 319
  • Revue celtique. (1888). France: F. Vieweg., p 374

Catalan

Verb

halo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of halar

Cebuano

Alternative forms

  • hawo

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo

Etymology

For the second noun sense, the monitor lizard's timidity likened to cowardice.

Noun

halo

  1. a monitor lizard
  2. (historical) a cowardly tattooed man

Verb

halo

  1. to mingle

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦalo]
  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo

Etymology 1

From Latin halos.

Noun

halo n

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Declension

Etymology 2

Noun

halo

  1. vocative singular of hala

Further reading

  • halo in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • halo in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the sun or moon).

Noun

halo c (definite singular haloen, indefinite plural haloer, definite plural haloerne)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin halos, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the sun or moon, ring of light around the sun or moon; threshing floor; disk of a shield), itself of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦaː.loː/

Noun

halo m (plural halo's, diminutive halootje n)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon).
  2. Similar visual effect resulting from undesirable, roughly circular spots on an imperfectly developed photograph.

References

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

Anagrams

  • hola

Esperanto

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhalo]
  • Audio:
  • Rhymes: -alo
  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo

Etymology 1

Of Germanic origin; related to German Halle, Dutch hal, also to Norwegian hall and Swedish hall.

Noun

halo (accusative singular halon, plural haloj, accusative plural halojn)

  1. (architecture) hall
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Interjection

halo

  1. Alternative form of hola
Usage notes

To avoid confusion with the above halo, the authors of the Plena Ilustrita Vortaro de Esperanto recommend including the particle lo or adding a space ("ha lo").


Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑlo/, [ˈhɑlo̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑlo
  • Syllabification: ha‧lo

Etymology 1

Verb

halo

  1. Indicative present connegative form of halkoa.
  2. Second-person singular imperative present form of halkoa.
  3. Second-person singular imperative present connegative form of halkoa.

Etymology 2

From English halo, from Latin halōs, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs).

Noun

halo

  1. halo
Declension
Derived terms
  • haloilmiö

Anagrams

  • Alho, alho, laho

French

Etymology

From Latin halos, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the sun or moon, ring of light around the sun or moon; threshing floor; disk of a shield), itself of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

  • (aspirated h) IPA(key): /a.lo/

Noun

halo m (plural halos)

  1. Halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
  2. Similar visual effect resulting from undesirable, roughly circular spots on an imperfectly developed photograph.

References

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Further reading

  • “halo” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • hola, holà

Galician

Verb

halo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of halar

Ido

Noun

halo (plural hali)

  1. hall, very large room

Indonesian

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch hallo. Compare Malay helo.

Interjection

halo

  1. hello

Latin

Etymology

Possibly a denominative verb from Proto-Indo-European *h₂enh₁-s-lo- (with spurious h), from *h₂enh₁- (to breathe), whence animus.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈhaː.loː/, [ˈhäːɫ̪oː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈa.lo/, [ˈäːlɔ]

Verb

hālō (present infinitive hālāre, perfect active hālāvī, supine hālātum); first conjugation

  1. breathe
  2. emit, exhale, release (gas or fragrance)
  3. be fragrant
    • P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid, Book I, ll. 416 ff.
      Ipsa Paphum sublimis abit sedesque revisit
      Laeta suas ubi templum illi centumque Sabaeo⁠⁠⁠
      Ture calent arae sertisque recentibus halant
      [Venus] goes flying back to Paphos and sees happily again her seat
      Where there is a temple to her and a hundred altars
      That warmly glow with Sheban incense and are perfumed by fresh wreaths.

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • adhālō
  • anhēlo
  • exhālō
  • inhālō
  • redhālō

Synonyms

  • spīrō, feo

Descendants

  • Old French: haler
    • French: haleter

References

  • halo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • halo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • halo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

halo m (definite singular haloen, indefinite plural haloer, definite plural haloene)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

halo m (definite singular haloen, indefinite plural haloar, definite plural haloane)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxa.lɔ/

Etymology 1

From English hallo.

Interjection

halo

  1. (when answering the telephone) hello

Etymology 2

From Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs).

Noun

halo n

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
  2. buzz, hype
Declension

Indeclinable.

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

halo

  1. vocative singular of hala

Further reading

  • halo in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the sun or moon).

Noun

halo m (plural halos)

  1. (astronomy) halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
    Synonym: auréola
  2. (religion, iconography) halo (luminous disc around the heads of saints)
    Synonyms: auréola, nimbo

Romanian

Etymology

From French halo.

Noun

halo n (plural halouri)

  1. halo

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

Noun

halo m (Cyrillic spelling хало)

  1. (astronomy) halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Etymology 2

From English hallo.

Interjection

halo (Cyrillic spelling хало)

  1. (when answering the telephone) hello

Synonyms

  • zdravo
  • ćao

Spanish

Etymology

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the sun or moon).

Noun

halo m (plural halos)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)
  2. halo (nimbus around the head of a holy figure)

Verb

halo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of halar.

Further reading

  • “halo” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

Medieval Latin, from Latin halos, from Ancient Greek ἅλως (hálōs, disk of the sun or moon). Related to English and Danish halo.

Noun

halo c (definite singular halon, indefinite plural halor / haloer, definite plural halorna / haloerna)

  1. halo (atmospheric phenomenon)

Declension


Tagalog

Etymology 1

Pronunciation 1

  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo
  • IPA(key): /ˈhaloʔ/

Noun

halò

  1. mixture (things mixed together)
    Synonym: timplada
  2. mix (substance added to a mixture)
    Synonyms: lahok, banto, sahog
  3. mixing; act of mixing
    Synonyms: paghalo, paghahalo
Derived terms

Pronunciation 2

  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo
  • IPA(key): /haˈloʔ/, [hɐˈloʔ]
Adjective

halô

  1. mixed together (by stirring)

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo
  • IPA(key): /ˈhalo/

Noun

halo

  1. pestle (for a mortar)
    Synonyms: pambayo, pandikdik, panligis
See also
  • mortero
  • pambayo

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English hello.

Alternative forms

  • helo

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ha‧lo
  • IPA(key): /haˈlo/, [hɐˈlo]

Interjection

haló

  1. hello!
See also
  • kumusta
  • uy

Anagrams

  • laho

Tetum

Verb

halo

  1. to do, to make
  2. to build

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.