had

had

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of had in English

English Online Dictionary. What means had‎? What does had mean?

English

Etymology

From Middle English hadde (preterite), yhad (past participle), from Old English hæfde (first and third person singular preterite), ġehæfd (past participle), from Proto-Germanic *habd-, past and past participle stem of *habjaną (to have), equivalent to have +‎ -ed. Cognate with Dutch had, German hatte, Swedish hade, Icelandic hafði.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hæd/
  • (had to): IPA(key): /hæt/, IPA(key): /hæd/
  • Rhymes: -æd

Verb

had

  1. simple past tense and past participle of have.
  2. (auxiliary) Used to form the pluperfect tense, expressing a completed action in the past (with a past participle).
    • 2011 April 15, Ben Cooper, The Guardian, London:
      Cooper seems an odd choice, but imagine if they had taken MTV's advice and chosen Robert Pattinson?
  3. (auxiliary, now rare) As past subjunctive: would have.
    • 1499, John Skelton, The Bowge of Courte:
      To holde myne honde, by God, I had grete payne; / For forthwyth there I had him slayne, / But that I drede mordre wolde come oute [].
    • 1849, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam, 24:
      If all was good and fair we met, / This earth had been the Paradise / It never look’d to human eyes / Since our first Sun arose and set.

Derived terms

  • had better
  • had best

Adjective

had

  1. (informal) Duped.
    We've been had.
  2. (obsolete) Available.

Usage notes

Had, like that, is one of a very few words to be correctly used twice in succession in English, e.g. “He had had several operations previously.”

Related terms

  • be had

Anagrams

  • ADH, AHD, DHA, HDA, dah

Afrikaans

Verb

had

  1. preterite of ; had

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *satos, from *sh₁-tó-, past participle of Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (to sow). Cognate with English seed.

Noun

had m (plural hadoù)

  1. (botany) seed

Central Cagayan Agta

Pronoun

had

  1. (interrogative) where

Czech

Etymology

From Old Czech had, from Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɦat]
  • Hyphenation: had
  • Rhymes: -at

Noun

had m anim

  1. snake

Declension

Derived terms

  • hádě
  • hadí
  • hadice

Related terms

  • hadice f

Further reading

  • had in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • had in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz, from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂d- (hate).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ad

Noun

had n (singular definite hadet, not used in plural form)

  1. hate, hatred

Related terms

Verb

had

  1. imperative of hade

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑt
  • IPA(key): /ɦɑt/

Verb

had

  1. singular past indicative of hebben

Hungarian

Etymology

From Old Hungarian hodu, from Proto-Ugric *kontə, from Proto-Finno-Ugric *kunta. Cognate with Finnish kunta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒd]
  • Rhymes: -ɒd

Noun

had (plural hadak)

  1. (military) army

Declension

Derived terms

  • hadászat
  • hadi

References

Further reading

  • had in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Jersey Dutch

Verb

had

  1. had
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      En kääd'l had twî jongers; []
      A man had two sons. []

Matal

Verb

had

  1. to walk, go

References


Middle English

Noun

had

  1. Alternative form of hod

Old Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Noun

had m

  1. snake

Declension

Descendants

  • Czech: had

Further reading

  • “had”, in Vokabulář webový: webové hnízdo pramenů k poznání historické češtiny [online][1], Praha: Ústav pro jazyk český AV ČR, 2006–2020

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *haiduz (state, condition, rank, person). Akin to Old Norse heiðr (dignity, honor), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃 (haidus, manner).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xɑːd/, [hɑːd]

Noun

hād m (nominative plural hādas)

  1. person, individual
  2. a character
    • c. 1011, Byrhtferth, Manual
  3. individuality
  4. rank, status
    • 9th century, the Blickling Homilies, "The Third Sunday in Lent"
  5. a person of the Trinity
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "Of the Catholic Faith"
  6. honor, dignity
  7. office (esp religious)
  8. state, condition; nature, manner
  9. gender
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "On the Nativity of the Holy Virgins"
  10. (grammar) grammatical person
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Excerptiones de Arte Grammatica Anglice
  11. race; kindred, family; tribe, group
  12. choir

Declension

Related terms

  • -hād

Descendants

  • Middle English: hod, hode, had, hade, hede
    • English: hade, hede (obsolete)
    • Scots: hade (obsolete)

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦat/

Noun

had m (genitive singular hada, nominative plural hady, genitive plural hadov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. snake, serpent

Declension

Derived terms

  • hadí
  • hadica f

Further reading

  • had in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic حَدّ(ḥadd).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /had/, [hɑ̈dʲ]

Noun

had (definite accusative haddi, plural hadler)

  1. limit
  2. boundary

Declension


Upper Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

Noun

had m

  1. snake, serpent

Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *sato-, from Proto-Indo-European *sh₁-tó-, past participle of *seh₁- (to sow). Cognate with English seed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːd/

Noun

had m pl or m sg (singulative hedyn, plural hadau)

  1. seed, seeds (collectively)
  2. semen, sperm

Related terms

  • hadu (to sow)

Bookmark
share
WebDictionary.net is an Free English Dictionary containing information about the meaning, synonyms, antonyms, definitions, translations, etymology and more.

Related Words

Browse the English Dictionary

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

License

This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.