ear

ear

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of ear in English

English Online Dictionary. What means ear‎? What does ear mean?

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪə̯/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: -eer

Etymology 1

From Middle English ere, eare, from Old English ēare (ear), from the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô (ear) (compare Scots ear, West Frisian ear, Dutch oor, German Ohr, Swedish öra, Danish øre), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ṓws (compare Old Irish áu, Latin auris, Lithuanian ausìs, Russian у́хо (úxo), Albanian vesh, Ancient Greek οὖς (oûs), Old Armenian ունկն (unkn), and Persian گوش(guš)).

Noun

ear (plural ears)

  1. (countable) The organ of hearing, consisting of the pinna, auditory canal, eardrum, malleus, incus, stapes and cochlea.
  2. (countable) The external part of the organ of hearing, the auricle.
  3. (countable, slang) A police informant.
    • 1976, Stirling Silliphant, Dean Riesner, Gail Morgan Hickman, The Enforcer.
      No I'm not kidding, and if you don't give it to me I'll let it out that you’re an ear.
  4. The sense of hearing; the perception of sounds; skill or good taste in listening to music.
    • Tennyson
      songs [] not all ungrateful to thine ear
  5. The privilege of being kindly heard; favour; attention.
    • Francis Bacon
      Dionysius [] would give no ear to his suit.
    • William Shakespeare
      Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
  6. That which resembles in shape or position the ear of an animal; a prominence or projection on an object, usually for support or attachment; a lug; a handle.
  7. (architecture) An acroterium.
  8. (architecture) A crossette.
Alternative forms
  • ere
Descendants
  • Tok Pisin: ia
Derived terms
  • Pages starting with "ear".
  • Translations

    Verb

    ear (third-person singular simple present ears, present participle earing, simple past and past participle eared)

    1. (humorous) To take in with the ears; to hear.
      • Two Noble Kinsmen
        I eared her language.

    See also

    • ear on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
    • aural

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English eere, er, from Old English ēar (Northumbrian dialect æhher), from Proto-Germanic *ahaz (compare West Frisian ier, Dutch aar, German Ähre), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp) (compare Latin acus (needle; husk), Tocharian B āk (ear, awn), Old Church Slavonic ость (ostĭ, wheat spike, sharp point). More at edge.

    Noun

    ear (plural ears)

    1. (countable) The fruiting body of a grain plant.
      He is in the fields, harvesting ears of corn.
    Synonyms
    • head
    • spike
    Derived terms
    • corn earworm
    Translations

    Verb

    ear (third-person singular simple present ears, present participle earing, simple past and past participle eared)

    1. (intransitive) To put forth ears in growing; to form ears, as grain does.
      This corn ears well.

    Etymology 3

    From Old English erian, from Proto-Germanic *arjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erh₃- (to plough).

    Verb

    ear (third-person singular simple present ears, present participle earing, simple past and past participle eared)

    1. (archaic) To plough.
      • 1595, William Shakespeare, Richard II:
        That power I have, discharge; and let them go
        To ear the land that hath some hope to grow,
        For I have none.
      • And the elders of that city shall bring down the heifer unto a rough valley, which is neither eared nor sown, and shall strike off the heifer's neck there in the valley
    Translations

    Anagrams

    • ARE, Aer, ERA, REA, Rae, Rea, aer-, are, aër-, era, rea

    Latin

    Verb

    ear

    1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of

    Middle English

    Noun

    ear

    1. Alternative form of eere (ear of grain)

    Old English

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /æːɑ̯r/, [æːɑ̯r]

    Etymology 1

    Akin to Old Norse aur.

    Noun

    ēar m

    1. sea
    2. earth

    Etymology 2

    From Proto-Germanic *ahaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (pointed).

    Noun

    ēar n

    1. ear (of corn)

    Alternative forms

    • æhher (Northumbria)

    Descendants

    • Middle English: eere, ear, ere, er, ȝer, eyre
      • English: ear
      • Scots: aicher, icker, aiker (< æhher)

    Scottish Gaelic

    Noun

    ear f

    1. east

    Antonyms

    • iar

    Derived terms

    • an ear
    • sear

    West Frisian

    Etymology

    From Old Frisian āre, from the voiced Verner alternant of Proto-Germanic *ausô, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ṓws. Compare English ear, Dutch oor, German Ohr, Danish øre.

    Noun

    ear n (plural earen, diminutive earke)

    1. ear

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    This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.