bag

bag

synonyms, antonyms, definitions, examples & translations of bag in English

English Online Dictionary. What means bag‎? What does bag mean?

English

Etymology

From Middle English bagge, borrowed from Old Norse baggi (bag, pack, satchel, bundle), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰak- (compare Welsh baich (load, bundle), Ancient Greek βάσταγμα (bástagma, load)).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: băg, IPA(key): /bæɡ/
  • (US, some dialects) IPA(key): /bɛɡ/
  • (US, Upper Midwest) IPA(key): /beɪɡ/,
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

bag (plural bags)

  1. A flexible container made of cloth, paper, plastic, etc.
  2. (informal) A handbag
  3. A suitcase.
  4. A schoolbag, especially a backpack.
  5. One’s preference.
  6. (derogatory) An ugly woman.
  7. (baseball) The cloth-covered pillow used for first, second, and third base.
  8. (baseball) First, second, or third base.
  9. (preceded by "the") A breathalyzer, so named because it formerly had a plastic bag over the end to measure a set amount of breath.
  10. (mathematics) A collection of objects, disregarding order, but (unlike a set) in which elements may be repeated.
  11. A sac in animal bodies, containing some fluid or other substance.
  12. A sort of silken purse formerly tied about men's hair behind, by way of ornament.
  13. The quantity of game bagged in a hunt.
  14. (slang, vulgar) A scrotum.
  15. (Britain) A unit of measure of cement equal to 94 pounds.

Synonyms

  • (flexible container): poke (obsolete), sack, tote
  • (handbag): handbag, purse (US)
  • (preference): cup of tea, thing, see also Thesaurus:predilection
  • (ugly woman): dog, hag
  • (in mathematics): multiset

Hyponyms

  • (flexible container): bindle

Translations

Verb

bag (third-person singular simple present bags, present participle bagging, simple past and past participle bagged)

  1. To put into a bag.
  2. (informal) To catch or kill, especially when fishing or hunting.
  3. To gain possession of something, or to make first claim on something.
  4. (transitive) To furnish or load with a bag.
    • Dryden
  5. (slang, African American Vernacular) To bring a woman one met on the street with one.
  6. (slang, African American Vernacular) To laugh uncontrollably.
  7. (Australia, slang) To criticise sarcastically.
  8. (medicine) To provide artificial ventilation with a bag valve mask (BVM) resuscitator.
  9. (obsolete, intransitive) To swell or hang down like a full bag.
  10. To hang like an empty bag.
    • 1934, George Orwell, Burmese Days, Chapter 3,[1]
      [] he was dressed in a badly fitting white drill suit, with trousers bagging concertina-like over clumsy black boots.
    • 2004, Andrea Levy, Small Island, London: Review, Chapter Eleven, p. 125,[2]
      And this uniform did not even fit me so well. But what is a little bagging on the waist and tightness under the arm when you are a gallant member of the British Royal Air Force?
  11. (nautical, intransitive) To drop away from the correct course.
  12. (obsolete, intransitive) To swell with arrogance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  13. (obsolete, intransitive) To become pregnant.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Warner. (Alb. Eng.) to this entry?)

Translations

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Korean: (baek)

Anagrams

  • ABG, AGB, BGA, GBA, gab

Antillean Creole

Etymology

From French bague.

Noun

bag

  1. ring

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • bagu

Etymology

Either of substratum origin or from a Vulgar Latin *begō, from Late Latin bīgō, from Latin bīga. Less likely from Greek βάζω (vázo, put in, set on). May have originally referred to putting animals under a yoke. Compare Romanian băga, bag.

Verb

bag (past participle bãgatã)

  1. I put, place, apply.

Related terms

  • bãgari / bãgare
  • bãgat

See also

  • pun

Breton

Etymology

Noun

bag f

  1. boat

Danish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -æː

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bak (back).

Adverb

bag

  1. behind

Noun

bag c (singular definite bagen, plural indefinite bage)

  1. (anatomy) behind, bottom, butt, buttocks
  2. seat (part of clothing)
Inflection
Synonyms
  • (behind): bagdel, ende, røv (informal)
  • (seat): buksebag

Preposition

bag

  1. behind

Etymology 2

Verbal noun of bage (bake).

Noun

bag n

  1. pastry
Synonyms
  • bagværk

Verb

bag

  1. imperative of bage

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French bague (ring).

Noun

bag

  1. ring

Meriam

Noun

bag

  1. cheek

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • bagg

Etymology

Borrowed from English bag, from Old Norse baggi.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæɡ/

Noun

bag m (definite singular bagen, indefinite plural bager, definite plural bagene)

  1. A purse more or less similar to a bag or sack.
  2. (on a baby carriage) a detachable part of the carriage to lie on.

References

  • “bag” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • bagg

Etymology

Borrowed from English bag, from Old Norse baggi.

Noun

bag m (definite singular bagen, indefinite plural bagar, definite plural bagane)

  1. A purse more or less similar to a bag or sack.
  2. (on a baby carriage) a detachable part of the carriage to lie on.

References

  • “bag” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Frisian

Alternative forms

  • bāch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *baugaz (ring) Cognate to Old English bēag

Noun

bāg m

  1. a ring

Declension


Rohingya

Etymology

From Sanskrit व्याघ्र (vyāghra).

Noun

bag

  1. tiger

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English bag, from Old Norse baggi.

Noun

bag c

  1. A kind of large bag; a duffel bag

Declension


Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From Meriam bag.

Noun

bag

  1. (anatomy, eastern dialect) cheek

Synonyms

  • masa (western dialect)

Turkmen

Etymology

Noun

bag (definite accusative bagy, plural baglar)

  1. garden

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This article based on an article on Wiktionary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history there. The original work has been modified. This article is distributed under the terms of this license.